Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. ha179's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Vietnamese
      • Home Country:
      • Vietnam
      • Current Location:
      • Vietnam

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 171
    #1

    Question Expression "kiss the pooch"

    Dear teachers and friends,
    One of my friends came across this article and we challenge ourselves by trying to paraphrase sentences in the story, i.e. rewrite them in simple English. With the help of Internet, we could easily search for the expressions' meanings from various sources. But near the end of the story there is a difficult expression, which I could only find in this post. After reading the text, I assumed the meaning of the phrase "kiss the pooch" as "collapse". I'm not sure if I've understood it right; so I'd appreciate if you can share with me your understanding.
    Thank you all in advance!
    Last edited by ha179; 25-Jun-2013 at 02:38. Reason: To improve a sentence

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 50
    #2

    Re: Expression "kiss the pooch"

    Without more context, I would not know what it means.

    I myself have done some search for this phrase on the Internet and come up with a different conclusion.
    At a wedding ceremony, the presiding or officiating person will say, "Now kiss the bride!" to signify that the groom and bride are now officially married.
    Once can use, "Kiss the pooch!" instead of "Kiss the bride" toward the end of dogs' wedding.

  2. ha179's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Vietnamese
      • Home Country:
      • Vietnam
      • Current Location:
      • Vietnam

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 171
    #3

    Re: Expression "kiss the pooch"

    Quote Originally Posted by driftwood View Post
    Without more context, I would not know what it means.

    I myself have done some search for this phrase on the Internet and come up with a different conclusion.
    At a wedding ceremony, the presiding or officiating person will say, "Now kiss the bride!" to signify that the groom and bride are now officially married.
    Once can use, "Kiss the pooch!" instead of "Kiss the bride" toward the end of dogs' wedding.
    First of all, thanks a lot for your response, Driftwood!
    Yes, I also found that search result, but I don't think it suits the context. The sentence that contains the expression in the article is "Well, I tried to soft peddle it for my friend's sake, but she really kissed the pooch on this one."; there isn't any wedding for dogs going on. Anyways, thanks again for taking your time trying to find the answer. I appreciate that!

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,109
    #4

    Re: Expression "kiss the pooch"

    Quote Originally Posted by driftwood View Post
    Without more context, I would not know what it means.

    I myself have done some search for this phrase on the Internet and come up with a different conclusion.
    At a wedding ceremony, the presiding or officiating person will say, "Now kiss the bride!" to signify that the groom and bride are now officially married.
    Once can use, "Kiss the pooch!" instead of "Kiss the bride" toward the end of dogs' wedding.
    The celebrant normally says "You may now kiss the bride". It's permission, not an order.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • New Zealand
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Nov 2010
    • Posts: 2,013
    #5

    Re: Expression "kiss the pooch"

    not a teacher

    I've not heard the phrase, but here's what I think.
    I've seen "pooched", as in "he pooched out his lip", meaning to pout in annoyance or something similar. There are a few examples in COCA.
    This link suggests that "to pooch" is more of a kissing action: https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/pooch
    My guess is that "to kiss the pooch" means to act sulky and annoyed, which fits context of the article.


    PS:Yes, that sounds more likely, Rover (below).
    Last edited by JMurray; 25-Jun-2013 at 08:32.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,516
    #6

    Re: Expression "kiss the pooch"

    I think it's a euphemism for 'screw the pooch', itself a euphemism for 'f*ck the dog'.

    screw the pooch

    1. (idiomatic) to screw up; to fail in dramatic and ignominious fashion


    (Wiktionary)

    Click here for the etymology.

    I found the above by going to OneLook Dictionary Search and entering *pooch (find words and phrases that end with 'pooch').

    Rover
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 25-Jun-2013 at 09:17.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,925
    #7

    Re: Expression "kiss the pooch"

    Aha! I knew it reminded me of something. One of my favourite films (Stand By Me) contains the line "He really screwed the pooch", meaning to mess up or screw up really badly.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. ha179's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Vietnamese
      • Home Country:
      • Vietnam
      • Current Location:
      • Vietnam

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 171
    #8

    Re: Expression "kiss the pooch"

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    I think it's a euphemism for 'screw the pooch', itself a euphemism for 'f*ck the dog'.

    screw the pooch

    1. (idiomatic) to screw up; to fail in dramatic and ignominious fashion


    (Wiktionary)

    Click here for the etymology.

    I found the above by going to OneLook Dictionary Search and entering *pooch (find words and phrases that end with 'pooch').

    Rover
    Thank you so much for your answer as well as instruction to find the answer, dear Rover! Now not only has my query been dealt with, but I also got to know one great searching site :) Your share is deeply appreciated!

  6. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,109
    #9

    Re: Expression "kiss the pooch"

    I think something has gone wrong with this thread. Has someone come up with meaning of "Kiss the pooch"?
    THe OP has given this link as the source:
    LIPA: Kissing the Pooch
    It doesn't seem to refer to intercourse with dogs.
    But for anyone really interested, the author has kindly given his email address at the bottom.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,516
    #10

    Re: Expression "kiss the pooch"

    The LIPA is reported to have 'failed in dramatic and ignominious fashion' (Wikipedia).

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-May-2013, 09:53
  2. Does "Basio Diem" mean "kiss the day"?
    By NewHopeR in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-Oct-2012, 07:30
  3. [Idiom] "pooch"
    By Olympian in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 24-Aug-2008, 12:36
  4. idiomatic expression "missed the proverbial boat"
    By angelafreitas in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 24-Oct-2006, 21:10

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •