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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    set you up for

    1.Does "set up someone for something" mean "get someone into a state"?
    2. Does "sit something out" mean "you stay inside, waiting for an activity to end" or "just leave the place where an activity is happening"? I think the former.

    35)When you get into your new exercise routine, proper rest is of great importance. If you’re sore while exercising, stop it immediately, as overuse will set you up for injuries such as muscle aches. If you are in a group fitness class, don’t always listen to the instructor or mimic what everyone else is doing. If you don’t feel comfortable with any part of the class, sit it out. This gives your muscles enough time to prepare for the stress it’s about to endure. Then, your body will thank you later by helping to prevent any possibility of an injury from occurring

  2. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: set you up for

    1. I read it as "overuse increases the chance of getting injured".
    2. See second definition:

    sit something ↔ out phrasal verb
    1 to stay where you are and do nothing until something finishes, especially something boring or unpleasant : She had two weeks to sit it out while she waited to hear if she had got the job.
    She was prepared to sit out the years of Jack’s jail sentence.

    2 to not take part in something, especially a game or dance, when you usually take part : Johnson sat out the game with a shoulder injury.
    (
    Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English)
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: set you up for

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    1.Does "set up someone for something" mean "get someone into a state"?
    2. Does "sit something out" mean "you stay inside, waiting for an activity to end" or "just leave the place where an activity is happening"? I think the former.

    35)When you get into your new exercise routine, proper rest is of great importance. If you’re sore while exercising, stop it immediately, as overuse will set you up for injuries such as muscle aches. If you are in a group fitness class, don’t always listen to the instructor or mimic what everyone else is doing. If you don’t feel comfortable with any part of the class, sit it out. This gives your muscles enough time to prepare for the stress it’s about to endure. Then, your body will thank you later by helping to prevent any possibility of an injury from occurring
    To "set you up" is to put you in a position or to prepare you. If you become sore you are in a position (ready, or more liable) to have injuries. Try this, "I will set it up so that you will have an audition this afternoon" - I will arrange things so that someone will see your performance.

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