Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 5,226
    #1

    not just for a brave young girl, but for an entire team.

    Does this denote "(not only) for a brave young girl, (but also) for an entire team."? , not (not A but B)?
    If so, can the second "for" be omitted like "not just for a brave young girl, but an entire team"? A question says "for" can't be omitted,and I'd like to know if it is true.


    38)Despite her initial hesitation, Cylie herself is now extremely happy about the rule that was designed especially for her. Now Cylie enjoys being part of a team again and is proud of her improving free throw shooting skills. She even set her new personal record of making eight successful shots in a row. But most importantly, she knows that none of this would ever have happened without the support and encouragement of her teammates, all of whom have grown particularly close to one another. “We’re all like sisters,” explained one. “We’re a big family.” So each time Cylie steps onto the basketball court to take free throws, the spectators cheer wildly - not just for a brave young girl, but for an entire team.
    Last edited by keannu; 04-Jul-2013 at 15:22.

  2. charliedeut's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 5,560
    #2

    Re: not just for a brave young girl, but for an entire team.

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Does this denote "(not only) for a brave young girl, (but also) for an entire team."? , not (not A but B)? IMO, yes.
    If so, can the second "for" be omitted like "not just for a brave young girl, but an entire team"? IMO, no
    38)Despite her initial hesitation, Cylie herself is now extremely happy about the rule that was designed especially for her. Now Cylie enjoys being part of a team again and is proud of her improving free throw shooting skills. She even set her new personal record of making eight successful shots in a row. But most importantly, she knows that none of this would ever have happened without the support and encouragement of her teammates, all of whom have grown particularly close to one another. “We’re all like sisters,” explained one. “We’re a big family.” So each time Cylie steps onto the basketball court to take free throws, the spectators cheer wildly - not just for a brave young girl, but for an entire team.
    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  3. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 5,226
    #3

    Re: not just for a brave young girl, but for an entire team.

    I think the reason why you can't omit the second "for" is that if you do, it lacks an important nuance that is essential. It's like missing a screw in a machine running well. If my opinion is incorrect, please let me know.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] The young migrants emigrat or The young migrant emigrates??
    By yjso21 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-Apr-2013, 15:32
  2. None but the brave deserve(s) the fair?
    By keannu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 15-Mar-2011, 21:52
  3. What the real meaning for "young girl"?
    By BRENOIRONMAIDEN in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15-Oct-2010, 05:05
  4. Tom is more wise than brave.
    By angliholic in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-Dec-2007, 19:06

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •