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    #1

    How to sound friendly and firm when disagreeing/explaining things?

    Hello all,

    I want to explain some things but I want to sound friendly and firm. Is there some way to do that?

    For example, I thought of the word "respectfully", not sure how to use it correctly, can I say something like:

    "I respectfully think that the idea given by Peter is not really useful because it has exceeded out budget."


    Besides the word "respectfully", are there other words/ways to sound friendly and firm while disagreeing or giving my own opinions/suggestions?


    Thanks.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: How to sound friendly and firm when disagreeing/explaining things?

    "Peter's idea is good, but implementing it would exceed our budget."

    Say something positive about Peter's idea before you reject it.

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    #3

    Re: How to sound friendly and firm when disagreeing/explaining things?

    not a teacher

    This is very difficult to answer from a distance because there are so many important variables and other factors that we can't be aware of.
    The term "respectfully" can be useful here, another common form is "With (all) due respect to Peter, I don't think we have the budget to carry out his ideas… etc"
    But tone of voice can mean the difference between Peter feeling he has been shown respect and, instead, been vaguely patronized.

    One way to show respect for somebody in this sort of situation is to firstly thank them for their contribution and, if possible, comment on an aspect of it that you like before saying why it isn't practical.

    "I'd like to thank Peter for his suggestion and I do like the idea of us getting more people involved in the project, but unfortunately our budget wouldn't cover that".

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    #4

    Re: How to sound friendly and firm when disagreeing/explaining things?

    What if I was given too much task to do within a day, is there any way to say it so that it does not sound like a complain, just telling the facts to let someone know?

    Does it seems right to say: I respectfully think that I have too much task to handle.

    Any better suggestions?

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