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    #1

    Now that I got "to know you"

    "Now that I get to know you, I feel so much better."

    Am I correct if I think that the infinitive phrase in the sentence acts as a direct object of "got"?

    My textbook said that the meaning of "got" in this context means changing from one state to another (occurrence), but it doesn't state whether the infinitive that follows is a direct object or not.
    Last edited by hothead2692; 21-Jul-2013 at 01:05.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Now that I got "to know you"

    That sentence makes no sentence to me. It starts with 'Now', and the rest is in the past tense. Are you sure that's what the book says?

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    #3

    Re: Now that I got "to know you"

    My bad, I fixed it. Now can you answer my question? Thank you

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Now that I got "to know you"

    Quote Originally Posted by hothead2692 View Post
    My bad, I fixed it. Now can you answer my question? Thank you
    It still needs fixing.

    "Now that I have gotten to know you, I feel much better."

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    #5

    Re: Now that I got "to know you"

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    It still needs fixing.

    "Now that I have gotten to know you, I feel much better."
    That sounds foreign to most BE speakers, who only use 'gotten' when trying to sound like an American.

    'Now that I have got to know you...' is just fine by us.

    (Though the use of 'my bad' indicates hothead's leaning towards AE.)





    Rover

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Now that I got "to know you"

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    That sounds foreign to most BE speakers, who only use 'gotten' when trying to sound like an American.

    'Now that I have got to know you...' is just fine by us.

    (Though the use of 'my bad' indicates hothead's leaning towards AE.)





    Rover
    I think the reason we use "gotten" is to avoid the confusion that might be created by "have got to" also meaning "must".

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    #7

    Re: Now that I got "to know you"

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I think the reason we use "gotten" is to avoid the confusion that might be created by "have got to" also meaning "must".
    That may well be the case but we don't use "gotten" in BrE and I don't think we are constantly confused about the meaning.

    Now that I have got to know you, I feel so much better.

    I can't imagine anyone thinking that the first half is to do with obligation, especially since "to get to know someone" is a common phrase. Context makes it clear as with "Now that I have got to lose weight, I'll have to stop eating so much pizza".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Now that I got "to know you"

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    That may well be the case but we don't use "gotten" in BrE and I don't think we are constantly confused about the meaning.

    Now that I have got to know you, I feel so much better.

    I can't imagine anyone thinking that the first half is to do with obligation, especially since "to get to know someone" is a common phrase. Context makes it clear as with "Now that I have got to lose weight, I'll have to stop eating so much pizza".
    I think that we got "gotten" originally from British English. Then for some reason, BrE stopped using the word. Never understood that.

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    #9

    Re: Now that I got "to know you"

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I think that we got "gotten" originally from British English. Then for some reason, BrE stopped using the word. Never understood that.
    That may well be the case but we certainly don't use it in standard BrE now.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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