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    #1

    Use of 'will' in formal written English

    We use the present continuous to say what you have already arranged to do. Do not use "will" to talk about what you have already arranged to do. (English Grammar in Use-Cambridge)

    I was wondering if the following sentences both possible in written English.

    1. The wedding will take place at St. Andrew's on August 30th.
    2. The wedding is taking place at St. Andrew's on August 30th.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by Winwin2011; 23-Jul-2013 at 18:21.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Use of 'will' in formal written English

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    We use the present continuous to say what you have already arranged to do. Do not use "will" to talk about what you have already arranged to do. (English Grammar in Use-Cambridge)

    I was wondering if the following sentences both possible in written English.

    1. The wedding will take place at St. Andrew's on August 30th.
    2. The wedding is taking place at St. Andrew's on August 30th.

    Thanks.
    Both of those sentences are correct. I actually prefer the first. I disagree with the rule you have quoted.

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    #3

    Re: Use of 'will' in formal written English

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Both of those sentences are correct. I actually prefer the first. I disagree with the rule you have quoted.
    Thanks MikeNewYork

    Does American English prefer to use "will" instead of "present continuous" when we talk about the future? Why did you
    disagree with the rule I have quoted.
    Last edited by Winwin2011; 25-Jul-2013 at 19:18.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Use of 'will' in formal written English

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Thanks MikeNewYork

    Does American English prefer to use "will" instead of "present continuous" when we talk about the future? Why did you
    disagree with the rule I have quoted.
    I AmE we use both. I disagreed with your rule only because it prohibited one use. That is simply not true.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Use of 'will' in formal written English

    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: Use of 'will' in formal written English

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    We use the present continuous to say what you have already arranged to do. Do not use "will" to talk about what you have already arranged to do. (English Grammar in Use-Cambridge)

    I was wondering if the following sentences both possible in written English.

    1. The wedding will take place at St. Andrew's on August 30th.
    2. The wedding is taking place at St. Andrew's on August 30th.

    Thanks.
    The advice in your grammar book is good provided it is correctly interpreted. We normally do not use 'will' to express a personal intention or arrangement (i.e. with 'I' as subject), so that the natural response to e.g. "What are your plans for the weekend?" is not "I'll play tennis with Mark" but "I'm playing tennis with Mark".

    Your cited sentences about the time & place of a wedding, however, are essentially considered predictions rather than expressions of intention, and 'will' can indeed, especially in more formal contexts, serve to express predictions (while, conversationally, 'be going to V' is more common). In writing at least, #2 above would be rather unlikely.

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    #7

    Re: Use of 'will' in formal written English

    Thanks all for your help.

    In accordance to the book written by L.G. Alexander thirty years ago:

    9.37.2 'Will' in formal style for scheduled events
    Will is used in preference to be going to [> 9.44] when a formal style ,, is required, particularly in the written language:
    The wedding will take place at St Andrew's on June 27th The reception will be at the Anchor Hotel
    (Longman English Grammar-L.G. Alexander)

    I was wondering if "will" is used in preference of "present continuous/going to" in modern WRITTEN ENGLISH.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Use of 'will' in formal written English

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Thanks all for your help.

    In accordance to the book written by L.G. Alexander thirty years ago:

    9.37.2 'Will' in formal style for scheduled events
    Will is used in preference to be going to [> 9.44] when a formal style ,, is required, particularly in the written language:
    The wedding will take place at St Andrew's on June 27th The reception will be at the Anchor Hotel
    (Longman English Grammar-L.G. Alexander)

    I was wondering if "will" is used in preference of "present continuous/going to" in modern WRITTEN ENGLISH.
    "The wedding will take place at St Andrew's on June 27th The reception will be at the Anchor Hotel." This is certainly more natural and elegant than it would be with "present continuous" or "be going to".

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