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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    taste like much.

    I don't understand what this "like much" means here. Is it a typo or something?

    21)W:There's more than just one kind of vegetarian. Some people only eat vegetables, but I eat vegetables with dairy products and eggs.
    M:Then, how do the vegetables here taste? Frankly speaking, I don't think any vegetables taste like much.
    W: Well, the vegetables here taste great. And they have a lot of delicious dressings, too.

  2. FreeToyInside's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: taste like much.

    That's not a typo. M is saying that he doesn't think vegetables have a lot of flavor. A slightly longer way of saying the same thing is "I don't think vegetables taste like much of anything." You can use that to describe any food that you think is lacking in flavor:

    "On its own, tofu doesn't taste like much. It will take on the flavor of whatever you cook it with."
    "This soup doesn't taste like much - I think it needs some seasoning."

    I think the "like much" part gives the feeling that you think there's not a lot (of flavor) there, or like you're comparing it to other foods and it doesn't taste like anything else. I think perhaps it feels clearer when you look at other instances of "like much." You can commonly hear people say "sound/seem/look like much," where it means that it doesn't sound/seem/look like what you're talking about is a large quantity of something, or that the thing might sound/seem/look unimportant or unappealing, like in:

    "Twenty dollars may not sound like much, but it's a lot of money to a child." (it doesn't sound like a large or important amount)
    "The house doesn't seem/look like much on the outside, but the inside is beautiful." (from the outside, the house may look small or like it's not a nice place)
    "I know he doesn't sound like much to you, but I think he's fantastic." (you think he's not interesting/funny/handsome/appealing, but I think he is)
    "This painting doesn't look like much of anything to me, but last week it sold for $1 million." (I thought the painting was uninteresting or unappealing, or I literally thought it was a painting of nothing but lines that don't resemble anything)

    I hope this helps!

    (not a teacher, just a language lover)

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    #3

    Re: taste like much.

    I'm more used to seeing and saying 'It doesn't taste of much'.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: taste like much.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    I'm more used to seeing and saying 'It doesn't taste of much'.
    Same for me.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. FreeToyInside's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: taste like much.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Same for me.
    It's funny how many UK movies and TV shows I can watch, and I don't notice many differences like this unless somebody points them out!

    Out of curiosity, do you say then "It may not look/sound like much..." meaning something of importance or value, or do you say "It may not look/sound of much?"

    (not a teacher, just a language lover)

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: taste like much.

    Quote Originally Posted by FreeToyInside View Post
    It's funny how many UK movies and TV shows I can watch, and I don't notice many differences like this unless somebody points them out!

    Out of curiosity, do you say then "It may not look/sound like much..." meaning something of importance or value, or do you say "It may not look/sound of much?"

    (not a teacher, just a language lover)
    It may not sound/look like much.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. probus's Avatar
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    I'm more used to seeing and saying 'It doesn't taste of much'.
    In my opinion, taste like is more likely in AmE and taste of in BrE.

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