Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. Banned
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Jun 2013
    • Posts: 637
    #1

    especially their fondness for Edmund Spenser and the early John Milton

    Though Gray never knew William Collins and had no association with the Wartons in the 1740s, he shared their interests and many of their tastes, especially their fondness for Edmund Spenser and the early John Milton.

    Source: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Thomas Gray (1716-1771)

    Hello teachers,

    In my opinion it means William Collins and Wartons were the fans of Edmund Spenser and John Milton and Gray showed their (William Collins and Wartons) fondness to Edmund Spenser and John Milton.
    Am I right?

  2. Banned
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Jun 2013
    • Posts: 637
    #2

    Re: especially their fondness for Edmund Spenser and the early John Milton

    I found the answer of my question.

    It's saying that Gray, William Collins and the Wartons all liked the writing of Spencer and Milton. That's why it says "early John Milton." Apparently they were particularly fond of the work Milton did early in his career.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #3

    Re: especially their fondness for Edmund Spenser and the early John Milton

    Quote Originally Posted by sb70012 View Post
    I found the answer of my question.

    It's saying that Gray, William Collins and the Wartons all liked the writing of Spencer and Milton. That's why it says "early John Milton." Apparently they were particularly fond of the work Milton did early in his career.
    That is correct. Please note that it should be the answer "to" my question.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #4

    Re: especially their fondness for Edmund Spenser and the early John Milton

    Quote Originally Posted by sb70012 View Post
    Though Gray never knew William Collins and had no association with the Wartons in the 1740s, he shared their interests and many of their tastes, especially their fondness for Edmund Spenser and the early John Milton.

    Source: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Thomas Gray (1716-1771)

    Hello teachers,

    In my opinion it means William Collins and Wartons were the fans of Edmund Spenser and John Milton and Gray showed their (William Collins and Wartons) fondness to Edmund Spenser and John Milton.
    Am I right?
    "Shared," not "showed."

Similar Threads

  1. Does You slept early means You wake up early?
    By Tan Elaine in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 25-Jul-2013, 12:58
  2. Don't understand a passage in Milton
    By vanveen in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-Jun-2013, 11:17
  3. Pronunciation of: Fred Edmund Jandt
    By symaa in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-Dec-2011, 13:12
  4. 'Paradise lost' reflects great credit ___ John Milton?
    By gagagafever in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 19-Feb-2011, 09:31
  5. Chaucer/ Spencer/ Milton
    By CHOMAT in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 26-May-2007, 19:08

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •