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  1. Banned
    Interested in Language
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    #1

    rove through the meanders of enchantment

    William Collins was born in Chichester and was educated at Winchester and Oxford. Coming up to London from university, he tried to establish himself as an author, but he was given rather to planning than to writing books. He came to know Samuel Johnson, who later remembered him affectionately as a man of learning who “loved fairies, genii, and monsters” and who “delighted to rove through the meanders of enchantment.”

    Source: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, William Collins (1721-1759)

    Hello teachers,

    I know the meaning of each word but I can’t understand the blue part as a whole.
    Would you please clarify it to me?

    Many thanks in advance.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: rove through the meanders of enchantment

    Quote Originally Posted by sb70012 View Post
    William Collins was born in Chichester and was educated at Winchester and Oxford. Coming up to London from university, he tried to establish himself as an author, but he was given rather to planning than to writing books. He came to know Samuel Johnson, who later remembered him affectionately as a man of learning who “loved fairies, genii, and monsters” and who “delighted to rove through the meanders of enchantment.”

    Source: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, William Collins (1721-1759)

    Hello teachers,

    I know the meaning of each word but I can’t understand the blue part as a whole.
    Would you please clarify it to me?

    Many thanks in advance.
    In my experience, "meanders" is rarely used as a noun in modern English. As a noun it means a circuitous or winding path (not a straight line). This sentence says that he loved to journey through a winding path of enchantment (fantasy). Today, he would be a sci-fi nut!

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