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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    with or witout "is"

    It seems like Armageddon day is just around the corner .

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    #2

    Re: with or witout "is"

    Welcome, qkama.

    We like you to ask an actual question.

    Why do you think 'is' may be omitted from your sentence?

    Rover

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: with or witout "is"

    Note the correct spelling of "without" (not "witout").
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Newbie
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    #4

    Re: with or witout "is"

    OK thanks but what I meant here there is a verb already in the phrase "seems", why do we need the "is" in the phrase? I hope this was an actual question..

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: with or witout "is"

    "Armageddon is just around the corner" is an embedded clause - it needs its own subject and its own finite verb.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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