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    #1

    Lunch as a verb

    Is it possible to use lunch as a verb?
    e.g.
    I lunch at 12:00 p.m on Mondays and Fridays.
    Is this sentence grammatically correct?Can I do the same thing with breakfast,I mean use it as a verb in the same way?
    Thanks in advance
    Moisés

  1. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Lunch as a verb

    I am not a teacher.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Lunch as a verb

    They can be used as verbs. That doesn't mean they are commonly used as verbs.

    If someone said to me "I breakfast at 8am" or "I lunch at noon", I would think they were either very posh or foreign. In everyday speech, the majority of speakers of BrE would not use them in that way.

    I have breakfast at 8am.
    I have lunch at 12 noon.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: Lunch as a verb

    Thanks a lot for your answer.It´s really clear now.
    Moisés

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    #5

    Re: Lunch as a verb

    Thanks a lot for your answer.Longman English Dictionary has cleared up my doubts.
    Moisés

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    #6

    Re: Lunch as a verb

    not a teacher

    This may be of interest to some, in light of emsr2d2's post.
    Ladies who lunch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Lunch as a verb

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    not a teacher

    This may be of interest to some, in light of emsr2d2's post.
    Ladies who lunch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Funnily enough, as I submitted my previous reply, the well-known and well-used phrase popped into my head. It is the only time I think we use it that way (and of course, most people who use the phrase won't be aware they're using lunch as a verb because in BrE, most people don't have the first idea about grammar).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: Lunch as a verb

    I just knew that lunch and breakfast are used as verbs. Is dinner used as verb too? It's clear that, that kind of expression is not used by majority of BrE speakers. How about American? Is that expression used by AmE speakers at least in everyday speech?
    Last edited by UM Chakma; 04-Aug-2013 at 16:10. Reason: added more contexts

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Lunch as a verb

    Quote Originally Posted by UM Chakma View Post
    I just knew that lunch and breakfast are used as verbs. Is dinner used as verb too? It's clear that, that kind of expression is not used by majority of BrE speakers. How about American? Is that expression used by AmE speakers at least in everyday speech?
    You say "I knew that lunch and breakfast are used as verbs". However, did you read my comment that in everyday speech, we don't use them like that? As far as dinner is concerned, some people might say "I dine at 8pm". Theoretically, "to dine" means "to eat food" so it is not specific to dinner. However, if it is used, it is normally used to denote the evening meal.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10

    Re: Lunch as a verb

    I admit that I didn't read the comment well. As far as all these expressions are concerned, I came to a decision that the best usage would be "I had my breakfast/lunch/dinner" as everyone would be understanding.

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