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    #1

    "What is in your box?" I asked. vs I want to know what is in the box.

    "What is in your box?" I asked.

    I want to know what is in the box.

    Can I say that in both sentences, there is no subject-verb inversion? If it isn't, can someone explain why?

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: "What is in your box?" I asked. vs I want to know what is in the box.

    Could someone please confirm? Thanks.

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    #3

    Re: "What is in your box?" I asked. vs I want to know what is in the box.

    You are correct. No inversion is necessary.

  1. moonlike's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "What is in your box?" I asked. vs I want to know what is in the box.

    Hi
    It's a kind of subject question, so there's no need to make an inversion. For instance,'could you tell me who is your teacher'? and 'who is your teacher?' both are subject questions.

    Hope I could help.
    Being a non-native teacher, I'm so thrilled being in such a superb forum.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "What is in your box?" I asked. vs I want to know what is in the box.

    Quote Originally Posted by moonlike View Post
    Hi
    It's a kind of subject question, so there's no need to make an inversion. For instance,'could you tell me who is your teacher'? and 'who is your teacher?' both are subject questions.

    Hope I could help.
    Except that the correct question is "Could you tell me who your teacher is?"
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. moonlike's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "What is in your box?" I asked. vs I want to know what is in the box.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Except that the correct question is "Could you tell me who your teacher is?"
    So you mean I was wrong regarding the subject questions that there's no inversion? 'who is your teacher?' isn't a subject question?

    Thanks
    Being a non-native teacher, I'm so thrilled being in such a superb forum.

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