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    #1

    try hard and try harder

    1.Try hard.
    2.Try harder.

    I think both the above commands I mentioned are correct. But what is the difference between the both in meaning. I guess there cannot have much difference in meaning. In #1, "hard" is used as an adverb. It's clear. But in #2, what "harder" is used as? Although I checked up if it is an adverb in the dictionary, I got no clarification. All I know is that "harder" is the comparative form of "hard". If if it is comparative form of hard, how come is it used in #2?

    Thanks,

  1. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: try hard and try harder

    Quote Originally Posted by UM Chakma View Post
    1.Try hard. This implies you had not tried hard before, as if you had just been testing your ground.
    2.Try harder. This means you tried hard before, but failed; therefore, if you want to succeed, you must try harder (=with an extra effort).
    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: try hard and try harder

    I got it. Is "harder" an adverb here?

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    #4

    Re: try hard and try harder

    Quote Originally Posted by UM Chakma View Post
    1.Try hard.
    2.Try harder.

    I guess there cannot have much difference in meaning. - Well, I don't think I can agree with you on that point. What are "comparatives" for, then?

    In #1, "hard" is used as an adverb. It's clear. But in #2, what "harder" is used as? - It's still used as an adverb.

    Although I checked up if it is an adverb in the dictionary, I got no clarification. All I know is that "harder" is the comparative form of "hard". If if it is comparative form of hard, how come is it used in #2? - "Comparatives" are used because there's a reason for it. They are used in the right context.

    Thanks,
    Please see my comments above in blue.

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    #5

    Re: try hard and try harder

    One thing is clear. Comparatives can represent as adverbs.
    Last edited by UM Chakma; 05-Aug-2013 at 18:24. Reason: added S

  3. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: try hard and try harder

    Quote Originally Posted by UM Chakma View Post
    One thing is clear. Comparatives can represent as adverbs.
    Well, I'd say adverbs (and adjectives, of course) have comparatives and superlatives.


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    #7

    Re: try hard and try harder

    I am a bit aware of that. For example: early-earlier-earliest. Is it okay? Oh! I got. Then "harder" is an adverb and it goes as "hard-harder-hardest". I have been confused because "hard" is sometimes used as an adjective; Also it goes as hard-harder-hardest. Now I got. Then the adverb "hard" has another form: i.e. "hardly". Okay! Now all clear. I have no words to thank you.


    Another simple question: Does "hardly" have comparative and superlative forms?

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    #8

    Re: try hard and try harder

    Quote Originally Posted by UM Chakma View Post
    I am a bit aware of that. For example: early-earlier-earliest. Is it okay? Oh! I got. Then "harder" is an adverb and it goes as "hard-harder-hardest". I have been confused because "hard" is sometimes used as an adjective; Also it goes as hard-harder-hardest. Now I got. Then the adverb "hard" has another form: i.e. "hardly". Okay! Now all clear. I have no words to thank you.


    Another simple question: Does "hardly" have comparative and superlative forms?
    No, it doesn't.

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    #9

    Re: try hard and try harder

    Quote Originally Posted by UM Chakma View Post
    I am a bit aware of that. For example: early-earlier-earliest. Is it okay? Oh! I got. Then "harder" is an adverb and it goes as "hard-harder-hardest". I have been confused because "hard" is sometimes used as an adjective; Also it goes as hard-harder-hardest. Now I got. Then the adverb "hard" has another form: i.e. "hardly". Okay! Now all clear. I have no words to thank you.


    Another simple question: Does "hardly" have comparative and superlative forms?
    Watch out here. "Hardly" means "barely." "Hardly working" is not the same at all as "working hard."

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    #10

    Re: try hard and try harder

    Quote Originally Posted by UM Chakma View Post
    I am a bit aware of that. For example: early-earlier-earliest. Is it okay? Oh! I got. Then "harder" is an adverb and it goes as "hard-harder-hardest". I have been confused because "hard" is sometimes used as an adjective; Also it goes as hard-harder-hardest. Now I got. Then the adverb "hard" has another form: i.e. "hardly". Okay! Now all clear. I have no words to thank you.


    Another simple question: Does "hardly" have comparative and superlative forms?
    I am working hard = I am working diligently.
    Working is hard = Working is difficult.
    I am hardly working = I am barely working at all (I am working very little).

    As you have already been told, "hardly" does not have comparative and superlative forms. It should now be clear why not.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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