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    #1

    Question Question

    Hi There

    Could someone explain the words below please? i could'nt differentiate it ..


    1-0 Do we have an extra class this afternoon?
    2-0 Are we having an extra class this afternoon?
    3-0 Have we had an extra class this afternoon?
    4-0 Will we have an extra class this afternoon?
    5-0 Are we going to have an extra clss?


    ThankS

    Warmest Regards,


    -kahhong

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    #2

    Re: Question

    1- Every week
    2 - This week (future)
    3 - This week (finished)
    4-0 Will we have an extra class this afternoon?
    5-0 Are we going to have an extra clss?
    4 & 5 are pretty much the same to me

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    #3

    Question Re: Question

    thank tdol...

    what are the differences between number 2,4 and 5?

    thank you very much,
    Warmest Regards,


    -kahhong

  1. #4

    Re: Question

    Use whichever you like.
    All equally valid as questions.

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    #5

    Re: Question

    thanks, but i think it has different meaning right for 2, 4 and 5?

  2. rewboss's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: Question

    In this case, they are almost exactly the same. Generally, however:

    The present progressive with a reference to a future time indicates a future event that is already planned and arranged: "I'm flying to America in July" -- I have the tickets, I've booked the hotel and so on.

    The so-called "will" future is used to make a prediction. "The cost of fuel will rise in the next five years" -- that's a prediction which may be based on some evidence, but the speaker is confident that the prediction will come true.

    The "going to" construction is used to refer to a future event that the speaker is very certain about because the evidence is very clear: "She's going to fail her exams" -- she hasn't studied properly and she never does her homework. Because there must be strong evidence, it usually refers something that is about to happen in the very near future, possibly has already started: "He's going to fall off that building" -- I can see him standing very close to the edge, and he's swaying.

    These aren't exact rules, and sometimes it may be possible to use more than one -- as in your example with the extra class.

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    #7

    Exclamation Re: Question

    hi there,

    hmm why some sentence can not add ing? for an example , "do you know?" why could not be "are you knowing?"


    another threat is "what do you do at this holiday?"

    it refer to repeated action and true in general is it? or it refer to what that particular person do during ONly that holiday..



    thanks


    Warmest Regards,


    -kahhong

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    #8

    Question Re: Question

    Heloo1!

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    #9

    Re: Question

    Quote Originally Posted by kahhong
    hmm why some sentence can not add ing? for an example , "do you know?" why could not be "are you knowing?"
    Some verbs, usually indicating feelings, states or general facts, simply cannot be used in this tense -- or at least, not usually. "know" and "understand" are two examples.

    "what do you do at this holiday?"
    it refer to repeated action and true in general is it? or it refer to what that particular person do during ONly that holiday..
    "What do you do on this holiday?" would mean that "this holiday" happens regularly. For example:

    "Every year, I go to Barbados on holiday."
    "And what do you do on this holiday?"
    "Well, usually...."

    If you are talking about one specific holiday in the future or the present:

    "Next year, I am going to Marbella instead."
    "And what are you doing on this holiday?"
    "Well, my plan is...."

    or:

    "Hello! I didn't expect to see you here."
    "I'm on holiday."
    "Oh. What are you doing on this holiday?"
    "I'm just relaxing, having a good time...."

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