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    #1

    TEACHER (used vocatively)

    Hello everyone
    A few years ago I was told that the word 'teacher should not be used when addressing a high school teacher. However I have recently come across no fewer than ten examples on Google containing, among other things, the phrase, 'Excuse me teacher!'. I understand that the word 'sir' or 'miss (in the UK) or 'ma'am' (in the US) should be used instead, but why was I told that 'teacher' is best avoided vocatively when there are so many examples on the Net confirming the opposite?
    Thanks for your comments..

  1. renard's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: TEACHER (used vocatively)

    In North America (I can only speak for AmE), we use the term "Mr/Mrs/Miss ..." when addressing a high school teacher in a regular classroom. We do not use the term "teacher". In ESL classrooms, particularly classes with international students, addressing with "teacher" is common and generally acceptable. A "regular" high school teacher will find it unusual, but those of us who teach ESL understand that it is a sign of respect and are okay with being addressed as "teacher".

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    #3

    Re: TEACHER (used vocatively)

    Quote Originally Posted by wace View Post
    Hello everyone
    A few years ago I was told that the word 'teacher should not be used when addressing a high school teacher. However I have recently come across no fewer than ten examples on Google containing, among other things, the phrase, 'Excuse me teacher!'. I understand that the word 'sir' or 'miss (in the UK) or 'ma'am' (in the US) should be used instead, but why was I told that 'teacher' is best avoided vocatively when there are so many examples on the Net confirming the opposite?
    Thanks for your comments..
    There's no mystery here. Google does not weed out, or correct, non-English phrases. It collects whatever people write.
    Here's the first example of "Excuse me Teacher" on my Google page:
    Excuse me teacher
    I also get 3 hits for "excuse me taecher".

    My post does not touch on whether "Excuse me, Teacher" is correct or not. Did you want to discuss that?
    Last edited by Raymott; 10-Aug-2013 at 14:13.

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    #4

    Re: TEACHER (used vocatively)

    Quote Originally Posted by renard View Post
    In North America (I can only speak for AmE), we use the term "Mr/Mrs/Miss ..." when addressing a high school teacher in a regular classroom. We do not use the term "teacher". In ESL classrooms, particularly classes with international students, addressing with "teacher" is common and generally acceptable. A "regular" high school teacher will find it unusual, but those of us who teach ESL understand that it is a sign of respect and are okay with being addressed as "teacher".
    I think the correct form in that case would be "Teacher". It's a substitute name.

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    #5

    Re: TEACHER (used vocatively)

    Correct, capitalization would be required in writing because it is being used as a title to address someone

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    #6

    Re: TEACHER (used vocatively)

    You've got a point there. But all the examples I found seem to have been written by native speakers... not foreign students. That's what got me thinking. Thank you both, anyway||

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    #7

    Re: TEACHER (used vocatively)

    Raymott, you picked the only one that seems to have been written in France or by French speakers hahaah

  5. renard's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: TEACHER (used vocatively)

    Quote Originally Posted by wace View Post
    You've got a point there. But all the examples I found seem to have been written by native speakers... not foreign students. That's what got me thinking. Thank you both, anyway||
    There is a possibility that it is being used as a neutral term when speaking about to/about a teacher in general, rather than a specific teacher. I googled "excuse me teacher" and that is what it seems to be. A lot of those statements are also being used in a negative manner - sometimes people use "excuse me [teacher/other name or profession]" to introduce a rude statement!

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    #9

    Re: TEACHER (used vocatively)

    Quote Originally Posted by wace View Post
    Raymott, you picked the only one that seems to have been written in France or by French speakers hahaah
    Maybe, but I honestly did give you the first one on my list.

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    #10

    Re: TEACHER (used vocatively)

    Quote Originally Posted by renard View Post
    There is a possibility that it is being used as a neutral term when speaking about to/about a teacher in general, rather than a specific teacher. I googled "excuse me teacher" and that is what it seems to be. A lot of those statements are also being used in a negative manner - sometimes people use "excuse me [teacher/other name or profession]" to introduce a rude statement!
    But surely, you'd still still need a comma? "Excuse me, teacher".
    I'm not really quibbling about commas or capitalization. I'm objecting to this fascination with trying to work out the correct English meaning of an incorrect English phrase that some people have managed to type on the internet. Therein lies insanity.

    "Excuse me teacher can i go to the bathroom? LOL jk im going to walk around"
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Excus...21232487897116
    Is this right? Shouldn't 'i' be capitalised? Is "LOL jk" real English? Can we really say "im". I was always told to write "I'm" ...
    This was probably written by a native speaker, too. The default reply to "I found this on Google" is "So what?"

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