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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Think of

    Dear all,

    There is a question I want to know about phrasal verb.
    For some phrasal verb, like "think of",
    is some word omitted between "think" and "of"?
    e.g
    I am afraid to think of you.

    I suggest the original sentence is
    I am afraid to think myself of you.
    And "myself" is omitted.

    I hope someone can tell me whether my guess is right or wrong.
    Thanks.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Think of

    Quote Originally Posted by snob2 View Post
    For some phrasal verb, like "think of", is some word omitted between "think" and "of"?
    e.g
    I am afraid to think of you.
    No

    I suggest the original sentence is
    I am afraid to think myself of you.
    And "myself" is omitted.
    That is incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: Think of

    Welcome to the forums.

    There's nothing missing, and 'think of' is not a phrasal verb (click on the underlined link).
    Rover

  3. Newbie
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    #4

    Re: Think of

    As I understand, "of" follow a noun, i.e noun + of + .... .
    So I can't follow that verb + of.

    what is the meaning that verb + of ?

    Thanks
    Last edited by snob2; 11-Aug-2013 at 16:00.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Think of

    Certainly you can follow "think" with "of" and then a noun.

    But your question as changed. There is no reflexive sense to "think" - You can sing yourself a song, tell yourself a story, etc., and I guess you could even "think yourself a thought" (though it sounds very odd), but you don't "think yourself OF a thing."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Think of

    Quote Originally Posted by snob2 View Post
    As I understand, "of" is followed by noun.
    So I can't follow that verb + of.

    what is the meaning that verb + of ?

    Thanks
    Do you understand that "'of' is followed by a noun" does not mean "a verb cannot be followed by 'of'"?
    Also you can't think yourself. 'Of' can also be followed by lots of types of words, including pronouns. There's nothing wrong with, "I always think of you."

  6. Newbie
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    #7

    Re: Think of

    Sorry, I made a wrong statement.
    The previous question I want to ask is corrected as #4 thread.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Think of

    Quote Originally Posted by snob2 View Post
    As I understand it, "of" follow​s a noun, i.e noun + of + .... .
    So I can't follow that verb + of.

    What is the meaning that verb + of?

    Thanks.
    I don't understand your question. You used the word "that" twice (I have underlined them). What do you mean by "that"?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: Think of

    Let me rephrase my question of #4 thread.

    In my previous learning, “of” always follows a noun. (i.e., noun + of + noun / pronoun, etc)
    For example, He is a friend of mine.



    So I can’t get a phrase formed by “verb + of”, like I am afraid to think of you.

    I want to know whether “of” can follow a verb or not.

    If the answer is “yes”, does it mean that “of + noun/pronoun” can describe verb,
    or are there any other meanings?

    Thanks.

  9. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Think of

    It is NOT true that the word "of" must follow a noun.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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