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    #1

    what does these two phrases mean?

    1. full on
    2. far out
    Could anyone first explain the meaning and then show how it can be used in everyday conversation?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: what does these two phrases mean?

    Can you please provide the context in which you read these?

    Many phrases have many meanings, depending on how they are used.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: what does these two phrases mean?

    I often hear people talking using these two phrases, but not sure what they really mean.

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    #4

    Re: what does these two phrases mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by facecatwt View Post
    I often hear people talking using these two phrases, but not sure what they really mean.
    Since you're not keen to give any context, here's one meaning for each.
    "Full on" means "fully opened" as in a water pipe. "I'm not getting much water from this hose. Is it full on?"
    "Far out" refers to the extent that something is 'out'. "How far out from the centre of the city is Newtown?"; "Oh, about 20 km."

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    #5

    Re: what does these two phrases mean?

    not a teacher

    Both of these phrases also have common informal meanings that you might hear.

    full-on = unrestrained, undiluted, overwhelming
    At first she was just a little worried but it soon turned into a full-on panic.
    That was a very violent movie, too full-on for my tastes.

    a) How loud was the music at the concert?
    b) Full-on!


    far-out
    = strange, radical, eccentric
    He likes the far-out ideas in those science fiction novels.
    She never dresses conventionally, it's always something far-out.
    People will try some pretty far-out treatments when they get desperate for a cure.

    It can also mean "great", "fantastic". It's a little dated but I still hear it.
    a) We're having a party on Saturday.
    b) Far out! I love a party.
    Last edited by JMurray; 12-Aug-2013 at 11:23.

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    #6

    Re: what does these two phrases mean?

    Thanks JMurray. Your explanation makes so much sense to me!

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