Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Dec 2011
    • Posts: 327
    #1

    "I don't do this because I hate you"

    Hi,

    I noticed some people say sentences like "I don't do this because I hate you" to mean "I do this, not because I hate you"

    My question is, is this a habbit, or do most people tend to say it that way rather than the latter?

    Thank you!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 3,505
    #2

    Re: "I don't do this because I hate you"

    Quote Originally Posted by LeTyan View Post
    Hi,

    I noticed some people say sentences like "I don't do this because I hate you" to mean "I do this, not because I hate you"

    My question is, is this a habbit, or do most people tend to say it that way rather than the latter?

    You will hear either form, and it's "habit".

    Thank you!
    b.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,910
    #3

    Re: "I don't do this because I hate you"

    I think the first will be more common in speech- the second is more formal.

  1. charliedeut's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 5,560
    #4

    Re: "I don't do this because I hate you"

    How about using the continuous "I'm not doing this because I hate you"? I think I've heard it more often (in films, admittedly).
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 3,505
    #5

    Re: "I don't do this because I hate you"

    That too, especially for the moment of speaking or the immediate past.

Similar Threads

  1. [Vocabulary] "don't you" meaning at the begining of a sentence
    By Tryna learn English in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 25-May-2013, 23:13
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-May-2013, 21:53
  3. "You donít have to rob a bank"
    By Odessa Dawn in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-Dec-2012, 20:51
  4. [Grammar] AmI right to hate "Not only, ... but also"?
    By Angry Editor in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 23-Jan-2010, 17:30
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-Mar-2009, 03:53

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •