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    #1

    leading off today's show

    I read the news clip from CNN Student News with subtitles, April 12, 2013. However, I’m confused by the underlined parts in the following.

    So while Fridays may be awesome, the severe weather moving across parts of the US this week is not. But it is leading off today`s show. Earlier in the week some states got hit with huge snowfalls….

    (1) Why does the reporter emphasize “this week is not” and what does the sentence mean?
    (2) What does “it is leading off today’s show” mean?

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    #2

    Re: leading off today's show

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashiuhto View Post
    I read the news clip from CNN Student News with subtitles, April 12, 2013. However, I’m confused by the underlined parts in the following.

    So while Fridays may be awesome, the severe weather moving across parts of the US this week is not. But it is leading off today`s show. Earlier in the week some states got hit with huge snowfalls….

    (1) Why does the reporter emphasize “this week is not” and what does the sentence mean?
    (2) What does “it is leading off today’s show” mean?
    Fridays are considered the best day of the typical workweek ("awesome"), because workers look forward to the weekend. "This week is not" awesome because of the "severe weather". "Leading off today's show" is a typical statement used by broadcasters at the beginning of a segment to announce a featured or important (at least to them) news item and in the case of your example, the severe weather.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: leading off today's show

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashiuhto View Post
    I read the news clip from CNN Student News with subtitles, April 12, 2013. However, I’m confused by the underlined parts in the following.

    So while Fridays may be awesome, the severe weather moving across parts of the US this week is not. But it is leading off today`s show. Earlier in the week some states got hit with huge snowfalls….

    (1) Why does the reporter emphasize “this week is not” and what does the sentence mean?
    (2) What does “it is leading off today’s show” mean?
    1) ...the severe weather [that is moving across parts of the US this week] is not [awesome]

    2) It's the main story.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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