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    #1

    saltshaker

    Hi teachers,


    Where's the saltshaker? I want to sprinkle some salt on my potato chips. Correct?


    Many thanks.
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  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: saltshaker

    Quote Originally Posted by Naeem Afzal View Post
    Hi teachers,


    Where's the saltshaker? I want to sprinkle some salt on my potato chips. Correct?


    Many thanks.
    It's fine. You will also hear "Where's the salt?" or "Pass the salt". It's also called a "salt cellar" in the UK. Note that most potato chips already have a flavouring which includes salt. Also note that they're called "crisps" in BrE.

    In the 1970s and 1980s, there was a brand of crisps called "Salt 'n' Shake" - a bag of plain crisps and a small sachet of salt. You opened the bag of crisps, found the sachet of salt, opened it, sprinkled some/all of it into the bag, held the top of the bag closed and shook the bag to mix the salt with all the crisps. These days, readymade, packaged crisps already have their flavour.

    In BrE, your sentence would work if you removed "potato", leaving just "chips". Those are what are called "fries" in AmE.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: saltshaker

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    In the 1970s and 1980s, there was a brand of crisps called "Salt 'n' Shake".
    As you'll see from 'the little blue backs of salt are back' on this packet, the salt bags were an attempt at a nostalgic return to the past. It failed, because the 'bags' of salt were not like the twists that we had had in my childhood. The looked something like the badge on the right here, though they had no writing on them. They were made from some form of shiny greaseproof paper.

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    #4

    Re: saltshaker

    Quote Originally Posted by Naeem Afzal View Post
    Hi teachers,


    Where's the saltshaker? I want to sprinkle some salt on my potato chips. Correct?

    In AmE potato chips (or chips) are very thin wafer-like slices of pre-fried and pre-salted potatoes. So, if this is the snack you are referring to, I would be very careful of your sodium intake if you sprinkle any additional salt. On the other hand, if you refer to the pencil-shaped fried potato, served hot and often with an ample supply of catsup on the side (not for me) and typically with a hamburger, we would refer to these simply as fries or "French fries".


    Many thanks.
    b.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: saltshaker

    It is possible, and not very difficult, to get unsalted crisps (potato chips).
    (In India, well, Rajasthan to be more accurate, there are street vendors selling crisps/potato chips fried on the stall, you can get them with or without salt)

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: saltshaker

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    It is possible, and not very difficult, to get unsalted crisps (potato chips).
    (In India, well, Rajasthan to be more accurate, there are street vendors selling crisps/potato chips fried on the stall, you can get them with or without salt)
    It's much more difficult in the UK!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: saltshaker

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    It's much more difficult in the UK!
    Seabrooks from Yorkshire do unsalted crisps. Available in A*d*.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: saltshaker

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Seabrooks from Yorkshire do unsalted crisps. Available in A*d*.
    Despite the fact that's the supermarket where I shop, it took me an inordinately long time to work out what you meant!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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