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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 732
    #1

    stir

    Hello everyone,

    In the growing day, not a breath of dust stirred the wild grass and mimosa thorn.

    What does "stir" mean in the sentence above?
    Does it mean "move", i.e. absolutely no dust was moving along/over the grass, or does it simply indicate the complete absense of dust on the grass?

    Thank you.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
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      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,500
    #2

    Re: stir

    It means 'moved' or 'disturbed'.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,626
    #3

    Re: stir

    I don't find it at all natural with "a breath of dust". "A breath of wind" is idiomatic.

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