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    #1

    They beat him into confessing himself guilty.

    Hi,

    They beat him into confessing himself guilty.

    Is this idiomatic?

    Thanks in advance.

    Edit; This sentence would be more natural with accepting himself guilty, not confessing himself guilty.

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    #2

    Re: They beat him into confessing himself guilty.

    I'd use confessing (that) he was guilty. It's most likely literal in meaning.

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    #3

    Re: They beat him into confessing himself guilty.

    Quote Originally Posted by taked4700 View Post


    Edit; This sentence would be more natural with accepting himself guilty, not confessing himself guilty.
    No, it wouldn't.

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    #4

    Re: They beat him into confessing himself guilty.

    Thank you, Tdol and Rover.

    Honestly speaking, I just wished to make sure if the construction of "slap/punch/hit/beat/knock + object + into + gerund" could mean that you force someone to do something by slapping/punching/hitting/beating/knocking.

    Do you think the sentences below are idiomatic?

    1. They hit him into confessing that he was guilty.
    2. They punched him into confessing that he was guilty.
    3. They slapped him into confessing that he was guilty.
    4. They knocked him into confessing that he was guilty.
    5. They beat him into confessing that he was guilty.
    6. They stabbed him into confessing that he was guilty.
    7. They damaged him into confessing that he was guilty.

    And if with to-infinitive not with gerund, what do you say?

    8. They hit him to confess that he robbed the bank.
    9. They punched him to confess that he robbed the bank.
    10. They slapped him to confess that he robbed the bank.
    11. They knocked him to confess that he robbed the bank.
    12. They beat him to confess that he robbed the bank.
    13. They stabbed him to confess that he robbed the bank.
    14. They damaged him to confess that he robbed the bank.

    Thanks in advance.

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    #5

    Re: They beat him into confessing himself guilty.

    Quote Originally Posted by taked4700 View Post
    Thank you, Tdol and Rover.

    Honestly speaking, I just wished to make sure if the construction of "slap/punch/hit/beat/knock + object + into + gerund" could mean that you force someone to do something by slapping/punching/hitting/beating/knocking.

    Do you think the sentences below are idiomatic?

    1. They hit him into confessing that he was guilty.
    2. They punched him into confessing that he was guilty.
    3. They slapped him into confessing that he was guilty.
    4. They knocked him into confessing that he was guilty.
    5. They beat him into confessing that he was guilty.
    6. They stabbed him into confessing that he was guilty.
    7. They damaged him into confessing that he was guilty.

    And if with to-infinitive not with gerund, what do you say?

    8. They hit him to confess that he robbed the bank.
    9. They punched him to confess that he robbed the bank.
    10. They slapped him to confess that he robbed the bank.
    11. They knocked him to confess that he robbed the bank.
    12. They beat him to confess that he robbed the bank.
    13. They stabbed him to confess that he robbed the bank.
    14. They damaged him to confess that he robbed the bank.

    Thanks in advance.
    #5 is possible.

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