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    #1

    for/to

    Is it a rule?

    verb/adjective + for + noun
    Verb/adjective + to + verb


    Let's look as examples:


    I have to prepare (verb) for my exams (noun).
    I have to prepare (verb) to be (verb) able to talk about it in some detail.

    I'm 100% sure they are correct. But I have doubts as to the usage of for/to in the sentences below:

    It's an ideal (adj.) dress for a party (noun).
    It's an ideal (adj.) book to read (noun).

    I found out in one the language forums that 'to' in the last example should be changed for 'for' i.e.:

    It's an ideal (adj.) book for reading (noun).

    Which is correct: ideal to read/ideal for reading?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
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      • British English
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      • UK
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    #2

    Re: for/to

    Quote Originally Posted by marker View Post
    Is it a rule?

    verb/adjective + for + noun
    Verb/adjective + to + verb


    Let's look as examples:


    I have to prepare (verb) for my exams (noun).
    I have to prepare (verb) to be (verb) able to talk about it in some detail.

    I'm 100% sure they are correct. But I have doubts as to the usage of for/to in the sentences below:

    It's an ideal (adj.) dress for a party (noun).
    It's an ideal (adj.) book to read (noun).

    I found out in one the language forums that 'to' in the last example should be changed for 'for' i.e.:

    It's an ideal (adj.) book for reading (noun).

    Which is correct: ideal to read/ideal for reading?
    You seem to have taken the preceding word to make this rule. However, I suggest taking the following word.

    It's an ideal (adj) dress (noun) for a party (noun).
    It's an ideal (adj) book (noun) to read (verb).

    Having said that, there is nothing wrong with "It's an ideal book for reading".

    It's the perfect (adj) dress (noun) for a party (noun).
    It's the perfect (adj) dress (noun) to wear (verb) to a party (noun).

    I would not say "It's the perfect dress for wearing to a party" - although it's not grammatically incorrect, it's not very natural (in BrE at least).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
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      • English
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    • Posts: 3,505
    #3

    Re: for/to

    Quote Originally Posted by marker View Post
    Is it a rule?

    verb/adjective + for + noun
    Verb/adjective + to + verb


    Let's look as examples:


    I have to prepare (verb) for my exams (noun).
    I have to prepare (verb) to be (verb) able to talk about it in some detail.

    I'm 100% sure they are correct. But I have doubts as to the usage of for/to in the sentences below:

    It's an ideal (adj.) dress for a party (noun).
    It's an ideal (adj.) book to read (noun).

    I found out in one the language forums that 'to' in the last example should be changed for 'for' i.e.:

    It's an ideal (adj.) book for reading (noun).

    Which is correct: ideal to read/ideal for reading?
    In addition to ems's comments I would say that ".....for reading" without more context suggests to me that the book is "ideal" for the practice of reading, whereas "....to read" suggests it is "ideal" for its content.

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