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    #1

    Imperative mood and its negative form

    Hi!

    Imagine that we have the following sentence:

    You, open the door.

    Now what is its negative form? Are both of the following sentences correct?

    You, don't open the door.
    Don't you open the door. (I'm reading a grammar book. The book has only mentioned this sentence for negative form of imperatives. This sentence is kinda strange for me, that's why I want to know that are both sentence correct?)



    Now the last question, is it the same when we have a noun in imperatives?

    Affirmative: John, open the door.
    Negatives: John, don't open the door.
    or: Dont John open the door.

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    #2

    Re: Imperative mood and its negative form

    Don't open the door.
    Don't you open the door.
    John, don't open the door.

    If you had something like Hey you, don't open the door it would be fine, but you on its own sounds odd to me. If there were a pause between the two, it could be OK.

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    #3

    Re: Imperative mood and its negative form

    Quote Originally Posted by toloue_man View Post

    Dont John open the door.
    Isn't this one correct? It is the same as "Don't you open the door"

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Imperative mood and its negative form

    Quote Originally Posted by toloue_man View Post
    Dont John open the door?

    Isn't this one correct? It is the same as "Don't you open the door"
    No. It's not correct. Firstly, you have omitted the apostrophe from "Don't". Secondly, we don't position someone's name there in an imperative. "Don't you open the door" is a common but (in my opinion), non-standard phrase. I would say that it's a shortened form of "Don't you dare open the door".

    If you use someone's name in an imperative, then it goes at the beginning or the end.

    John, don't open the door.
    Don't open the door, Sarah.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: Imperative mood and its negative form

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post

    If you use someone's name in an imperative, then it goes at the beginning or the end.

    John, don't open the door.
    Don't open the door, Sarah.
    Even me as a non-native speaker of English have the same idea

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Imperative mood and its negative form

    Quote Originally Posted by toloue_man View Post
    Even me I, as a non-native speaker of English, have the same idea.
    Did you mean "Even I, as a non-native speaker of English, think the same"?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: Imperative mood and its negative form

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Did you mean "Even I, as a non-native speaker of English, think the same"?

    Yes! I thought mistakenly that "even" is a preposition.

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