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    #1

    the whole sentence with emphasis on evidence (which are listed hereunder)

    Hello everybody!

    To the contrary, I have found substantial evidence that indicate that in balance of all probabilities, the cause of the damage is something other than the alleged contamination of the lub oil system during the repairs by the Shipyards in June 2013, which are listed hereunder:

    11.4.1 Lub Oil filters were found to have operated satisfactory, with emergency elements clean and by-pass valves closed.

    11.4.2 Following repairs in Poland, the engine operated 613 hours until manifestation of the damage. IF some debris had been entrapped in the engine in Poland, the damage would have manifested itself much sooner.

    In my opinion, the above sentence could be translated as follows:
    To the contrary, I have found considerable evidence which/that indicates that most probably/most likely, the cause of the damage is something other than the alleged contamination of the lub oil system during the repairs by the Shipyards in June 2013, which is listed hereunder:
    The word "evidence" applies to "which are listed hereunder" ('which is listed hereunder' should be used).
    Thank you.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: the whole sentence with emphasis on evidence (which are listed hereunder)

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Hello everybody!

    To the contrary, I have found substantial evidence that indicate that in balance of all probabilities, the cause of the damage is something other than the alleged contamination of the lub oil system during the repairs by the Shipyards in June 2013, which are listed hereunder:

    11.4.1 Lub Oil filters were found to have operated satisfactory, with emergency elements clean and by-pass valves closed.

    11.4.2 Following repairs in Poland, the engine operated 613 hours until manifestation of the damage. IF some debris had been entrapped in the engine in Poland, the damage would have manifested itself much sooner.

    In my opinion, the above sentence could be translated as follows:
    To the contrary, I have found considerable evidence which/that indicates that most probably/most likely, the cause of the damage is something other than the alleged contamination of the lub oil system during the repairs by the Shipyards in June 2013, which is listed hereunder:
    The word "evidence" applies to "which are listed hereunder" ('which is listed hereunder' should be used).
    Thank you.
    No. "Which are listed hereunder" relates to "repairs", and therefore, the verb "are" is correct.

    Earlier in the first sentence I would have used "indicates" because evidence is singular.

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    #3

    Re: the whole sentence with emphasis on evidence (which are listed hereunder)

    Items 11.4.1 and 11.4.2 have nothing to do with the repairs, they describe what was found, how long the engine worked.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: the whole sentence with emphasis on evidence (which are listed hereunder)

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Items 11.4.1 and 11.4.2 have nothing to do with the repairs, they describe what was found, how long the engine worked.
    And? There is really no other way to read the sentence unless it was badly written. It says, "during the repairs by the Shipyards in June 2013, which are listed hereunder."

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    #5

    Re: the whole sentence with emphasis on evidence (which are listed hereunder)

    I don't see much logic in the sentence.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: the whole sentence with emphasis on evidence (which are listed hereunder)

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    I don't see much logic in the sentence.
    Could there be a listing of the repairs that occurs later in the document?

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    #7

    Re: the whole sentence with emphasis on evidence (which are listed hereunder)

    No, the repairs had been carried out.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: the whole sentence with emphasis on evidence (which are listed hereunder)

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Items 11.4.1 and 11.4.2 have nothing to do with the repairs, they describe what was found, how long the engine worked.
    Of course, you are right. What is "listed hereunder" is "substantial evidence", not "repairs".

    The sentence means: "To the contrary, I have found substantial evidence (listed hereunder) that indicate that in balance of all probabilities, the cause of the damage is something other than the alleged contamination of the lub oil system during the repairs by the Shipyards in June 2013:
    11.4.1 ..."

    It can't mean anything else. It's a badly written sentence. (I speak of the intended meaning; the real meaning, as you say, is illogical).

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