Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. Banned
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Jun 2013
    • Posts: 637
    #1

    Tastier than Vs. More delicious than

    Hello teachers,
    These are gradable and non gradable adjectives.

    (tired=exhausted) - (pleased=delighted) - (angry=furious) - (cold=freezing) - (freezing=boiling) - (tasty=delicious)
    (hungry = starving) - (exciting = thrilling) - (frightened = terrified)

    It's incorrect to use non gradable adjective with comparative or superlative form, although you use it in your daily conversations. I remember once I asked of some native English speakers whether they use the term "more delicious than..." or not. Some said "yes we use it" and some said "no we use tastier than...."

    I disagree with the first reply. In my opinion it's correct to say "tastier than" instead of "more delicious than"
    You know what bothers be a lot? This bothers me that when native English speakers use something in their daily conversations, they think it's correct because they use it. But let's think logically.

    What's your opinion about these two sentences?

    "tastier than...."
    "more delicious than..."

    Many thanks in advance

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #2

    Re: Tastier than Vs. More delicious than

    Quote Originally Posted by sb70012 View Post
    Some said "yes we use it" and some said "no we use tastier than...."

    I disagree with the first reply.
    You can't disagree with that. They are far more likely to know what they use than you are
    You know what bothers be a lot? This bothers me that when native English speakers use something in their daily conversations, they think it's correct because they use it.
    Many speakers of English, especially of British English, are not particularly bothered by the opinions of writers of style guides. if enough reasonably educated people use a particular word or construction, then we simply accept it.
    But let's think logically.
    Language doesn't work logically.

    What's your opinion about these two sentences?

    "tastier than...."
    "more delicious than..."
    I would almost certainly use only the first, but I don't think it would particularly jar if I heard the second.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #3

    Re: Tastier than Vs. More delicious than

    Quote Originally Posted by sb70012 View Post
    Hello teachers,
    These are gradable and non gradable adjectives.

    (tired=exhausted) - (pleased=delighted) - (angry=furious) - (cold=freezing) - (freezing=boiling) - (tasty=delicious)
    (hungry = starving) - (exciting = thrilling) - (frightened = terrified)

    It's incorrect to use non gradable adjective with comparative or superlative form, although you use it in your daily conversations. I remember once I asked of some native English speakers whether they use the term "more delicious than..." or not. Some said "yes we use it" and some said "no we use tastier than...."

    I disagree with the first reply. In my opinion it's correct to say "tastier than" instead of "more delicious than"
    You know what bothers be a lot? This bothers me that when native English speakers use something in their daily conversations, they think it's correct because they use it. But let's think logically.

    What's your opinion about these two sentences?

    "tastier than...."
    "more delicious than..."

    Many thanks in advance
    I agree with 5jj. There is most certainly nothing wrong with tastier or tastiest. Dictionaries even include those adjectives in the listings of "tasty". As to whether "delicious" can be graded depends on its definition more than the abstract opinions of grammarians. Some dictionaries define "delicious" as "tasty" or "appealing to the sense of taste or smell". If one accepts those definitions, one does not see "delicious" as an absolute, and the word can be graded.

    Imagine a person at a fair who is tasting products at a bake sale. The person samples a piece of apple pie and says, "That's delicious." Then the person samples a second apple pie and says, "Wow! This one is even more delicious!". Can the grammarian quoted above really say that the second use is incorrect or illogical? How would the taster know that the second pie is better than the first before he/she tastes it. To me, that would be illogical.

Similar Threads

  1. It's/these are delicious!
    By Winwin2011 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 14-Dec-2011, 08:46
  2. delicious
    By ziawj2 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 23-Oct-2011, 16:13
  3. delicious
    By edmondjanet in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-Mar-2011, 23:12
  4. Not delicious
    By hlbert03 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 18-Jan-2007, 12:32
  5. tastier more tasty, wittier more witty
    By Humble in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-Nov-2006, 08:10

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •