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    #1

    two sentences for help

    The following is from a commentary which I heard from the TV:

    So would it be another victory procession. Usain Bolt , unflappable. Almost unbeatable. The title is seemingly his for the taking. In a Moscow thunderstorm, what fireworks? America’s Justin Gatlin led at first, but Bolt came charging through, and once again, he was world champion. It was another dazzling display.

    I am not sure about the two underlined sentences.

    Do they make sense? If so, what do they mean?

    Thanks !

    Jason

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    #2

    Re: two sentences for help

    Quote Originally Posted by jasonlulu_2000 View Post
    The following is from a commentary which I heard from the TV:

    So would it be another victory procession. Usain Bolt , unflappable. Almost unbeatable. The title is seemingly his for the taking. In a Moscow thunderstorm, what fireworks? America’s Justin Gatlin led at first, but Bolt came charging through, and once again, he was world champion. It was another dazzling display.

    I am not sure about the two underlined sentences.

    Do they make sense? If so, what do they mean?

    Thanks !

    Jason
    The first says that Bolt seems to be unbeatable. He will take the title.
    The second is a bit obscure. The words "thunderstorm", "fireworks" and "dazzling display" may be playing on Bolt's name, as in lightning bolt.

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    #3

    Re: two sentences for help

    You say it's from a commentary you heard on TV, Jason, so you have probably transcribed the subtitles (AE closed captions), which are notoriously unreliable as examples of correct English. The question mark is wrong for one thing.

    I imagine the commentator was impressed by the ferocity of the thunder and lightning. His words could probably have been rendered more accurately thus:

    'In a Moscow thunderstorm (what fireworks!), America's Justin Gatlin...'




    A better title would have been '...his for the taking/what fireworks?'



    'Thread titles should include all or part of the word/phrase being discussed.'

    Rover

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    #4

    Re: two sentences for help

    Thanks! Rover. I'll pay more attention to the title.

    So what does "What fireworks!" mean in this context?

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    #5

    Re: two sentences for help

    Probably a particularly spectacular display of lightning and crashing thunder.

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