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  1. Hiya Raymond's Avatar
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    #1

    What's the difference between "in the beginning", "at the beginning (of)"

    What's the difference between "in the beginning", "at the beginning (of)" , "at the outset" and "from the get-go"?


    Thanks a million!

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What's the difference between "in the beginning", "at the beginning (of)"

    Quote Originally Posted by Hiya Raymond View Post
    What's the difference between "in the beginning", "at the beginning (of)" , "at the outset" and "from the get-go"?


    Thanks a million!
    I think you know us well enough to know that we want complete sentences, not snippets.

  3. probus's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: What's the difference between "in the beginning", "at the beginning (of)"

    "In the beginning" is the opening phrase of the Old Testament. Religious believers would probably interpret it as "in the absolute beginning", meaning that nothing existed before. All the phrases are synonymous, although they vary in tone and register. They all implicitly admit that other events are occurring or have occurred, but for that one tiny exception.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: What's the difference between "in the beginning", "at the beginning (of)"

    Hiya Raymond: "What's the difference between "in the beginning", "at the beginning (of)" , "at the outset" and "from the get-go"?


    That was the original question. Can we concentrate on that, please?

  5. Hiya Raymond's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: What's the difference between "in the beginning", "at the beginning (of)"

    Are those phrases correctly used in the following sentences?

    1. At/In the beginning of this century a great many Europeans went to live in the USA.
    2. He disliked it at / in the beginning.
    3. He was not here at the outset/from the get-go of the experiment.
    4. I warned you at the outset/from the get-go not to trust him, and you wouldn't listen to me.


    Thanks a lot!

  6. Hiya Raymond's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: What's the difference between "in the beginning", "at the beginning (of)"

    "Snippet" is a new word for me, thanks.

  7. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: What's the difference between "in the beginning", "at the beginning (of)"

    Quote Originally Posted by Hiya Raymond View Post
    Are those phrases correctly used in the following sentences?

    1. At/In the beginning of this century a great many Europeans went to live in the USA.
    2. He disliked it at / in the beginning.
    3. He was not here at the outset/from the get-go of the experiment.
    4. I warned you at the outset/from the get-go not to trust him, and you wouldn't listen to me.


    Thanks a lot!
    Thanks for the sentences.

    1. Either works for me.
    2. Either works for me.
    3. "At the beginning" would be better than either of those.
    4. Both work, but the second is very informal.

  8. probus's Avatar
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    #8
    2. There is also "from the beginning" which has a different meaning than "in" or "at".

    3. "From the get-go" is much less formal. It is slang really.

  9. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: What's the difference between "in the beginning", "at the beginning (of)"

    Quote Originally Posted by Hiya Raymond View Post
    "Snippet" is a new word for me, thanks.
    You're welcome.

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    #10

    Re: What's the difference between "in the beginning", "at the beginning (of)"

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    You're welcome.
    Wouldn't a click on the Like button have sufficed — pour encourager les autres​?

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