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  1. meliss's Avatar
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    #1

    had giddy

    Hi, I do not understand the construction of the phrase:
    "her latest hysterical outbreak had her husband back at their Arlington ranch-style home
    giddy".
    Firstly, I'd say "made giddy" - why had giddy?
    Secondly - " back at their... home" - does it mean that it was before, when they were at their home (and now they are already not)?
    Thank you.

  2. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: had giddy

    It is a poorly constructed sentence. What I presume the writer means is that "her latest hysterical outbreak resulted in her husband returning home to their Arlington ranch-style home feeling giddy". However, the writer is trying to express that in a more "racy" style.

    Having said that, the use of "had" to mean "resulted in" or "caused one to be" - as in "You had me fooled/worried etc" is fairly common in spoken English.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  3. meliss's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: had giddy

    From the context it appears that the writer is rather describing what had happened before, when they had been home (they are not any more). Is that a possible meaning?

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: had giddy

    Quote Originally Posted by meliss View Post
    From the context it appears that the writer is rather describing what had happened before, when they had been home (they are not any more). Is that a possible meaning?
    No. Why are you reading this book? It's appallingly written and it certainly won't help your English.

  5. meliss's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: had giddy

    I should :)

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: had giddy

    Quote Originally Posted by meliss View Post
    I should :)
    What do you mean by "I should"?

  7. meliss's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: had giddy

    I mean I must read it for some professional reasons.

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: had giddy

    What is the title of the book and who is the author?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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