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    #1

    Much to her bother.

    "She did that work,much to her bother".

    we use the expression 'much to her bother' to mean she was bothered about it.But if we want to mean the opposite of it( she was not bothered about it)then what should we use 'less to her bother'.like-Do whatever you like,less to my bother(I am not bothered).

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Much to her bother.

    Quote Originally Posted by sdpegasus View Post
    "She did that work,much to her bother".

    we use the expression 'much to her bother' to mean she was bothered about it.But if we want to mean the opposite of it( she was not bothered about it)then what should we use 'less to her bother'.like-Do whatever you like,less to my bother(I am not bothered).
    I would not try to flip that expression.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Much to her bother.

    Quote Originally Posted by sdpegasus View Post
    "She did that work,much to her bother".

    we use the expression 'much to her bother' to mean she was bothered about it.
    I have never heard that expression. Where did you find it?
    Last edited by 5jj; 31-Aug-2013 at 08:03. Reason: typo

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    #4

    Re: Much to her bother.

    I have come across this expression in newspaper "much to her bother".But I am not clear about the second one,I guess it should be "little to her bother"

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Much to her bother.

    Quote Originally Posted by sdpegasus View Post
    I have come across this expression in newspaper "much to her bother".But I am not clear about the second one,I guess it should be "little to her bother"
    I don't think that works. An analogy would be "much to her chagrin". "Little to her chagrin" would have no meaning.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Much to her bother.

    These are natural: Much to her amazement, amusement, annoyance, astonishment, chagrin, delight, dismay, distress, horror, relief, satisfaction, surprise.

    These are not: Much to her bother, little to her [anything].



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