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    #1

    get on with

    Hi,

    I find quite difficult to find the exact meaning of the bald phrasal verb below. I check it in my dictionary(Cambridge) but I really didn't find any word like that. Does it similar to "get along with"? To be honest, I know what "get along with" means but I do not understand "get on with".

    Peter: Are you going to Sarah's party on Saturday night?
    Lucy: I'm not sure. To be honest, I don't get on with some of the other girls who are going.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: get on with

    Quote Originally Posted by UM Chakma View Post
    Hi,

    I find quite difficult to find the exact meaning of the bald phrasal verb below. I check it in my dictionary(Cambridge) but I really didn't find any word like that. Does it similar to "get along with"? Yes. To be honest, I know what "get along with" means but I do not understand "get on with".

    Peter: Are you going to Sarah's party on Saturday night?
    Lucy: I'm not sure. To be honest, I don't get on with some of the other girls who are going.
    "Get on with" or "get along with" means "be able to have friendly relations with".

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: get on with

    PS - The words were in bold, not in bald. It was probably a typo, but just in case you had misheard the word...
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Newbie
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    #4

    Re: get on with

    Get on (well) with = Have a (good) relationship with

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: get on with

    PS - This was the right time to start a new thread instead of adding on the "to be honest" thread. I read that after I read the first post in this thread.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

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    #7

    Re: get on with

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    PS - The words were in bold, not in bald. It was probably a typo, but just in case you had misheard the word...

    Oh yeah. Thanks Barb you noticed it. It was a typo. However my mistake made me laugh at myself.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: get on with

    Quote Originally Posted by UM Chakma View Post
    Oh yeah. Thanks Barb you noticed it. It was a typo. However my mistake made me laugh at myself.
    If you know why it was a little funny, then your English is pretty good.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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