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    #1

    enter

    Dear teachers, I have doubts about how to use "to fit in" and "to get in" when these phrasal verbs mean "to enter". After looking them up on my English dictionary, I have come to the following conclusion. Please, correct me if I'm wrong.
    "fit in" is generally used for things and "get in" for people, like in these examples:
    1) (on an aircraft - I have to put my baggage under the seat in front of me and the flight attendant can ask me:) Does it fit in?
    2) (I want to load my car up with some bags and luggage but I notice there's a little room in it and I can say: ) All this luggage won't fit in.
    3) (I want to go to the cinema with my friends and we just have one car and I ask them: ) Shall we all get in?
    4) (I want to throw a party at my place and I want to have lots of people over and a friend of mine asks me: ) But, will they all get in? Isn't the house a little small for such a number of people?

    Now, on the basis of what I have written and of the examples given, can you tell if they are used correctly and how a native would use them or if I'm wrong and maybe they can be both used in each sentence?

    Thanks so much.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: enter

    1) (on an aircraft - I have to put my baggage under the seat in front of me and the flight attendant can ask me:) Does it fit in?
    Also: Can you get(/fit) it in?

    2) (I want to load my car up with some bags and luggage but I notice there's a little room in it and I can say: ) All this luggage won't fit in.
    Also: I can't get/fit all this luggage in.


    3) (I want to go to the cinema with my friends and we just have one car and I ask them: ) Shall we all get in? No. That's a suggestion.
    Can we all get/fit in?

    4) (I want to throw a party at my place and I want to have lots of people over and a friend of mine asks me: ) But, will they all get in?

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    #3

    Re: enter

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    1) (on an aircraft - I have to put my baggage under the seat in front of me and the flight attendant can ask me:) Does it fit in?
    Also: Can you get(/fit) it in?

    2) (I want to load my car up with some bags and luggage but I notice there's a little room in it and I can say: ) All this luggage won't fit in.
    Also: I can't get/fit all this luggage in.


    3) (I want to go to the cinema with my friends and we just have one car and I ask them: ) Shall we all get in? No. That's a suggestion.
    Can we all get/fit in?

    4) (I want to throw a party at my place and I want to have lots of people over and a friend of mine asks me: ) But, will they all get in?
    Thank you for your reply. So, if you should explain the difference between them, what would you say?

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    #4

    Re: enter

    I'd say that 'fit in' is more specific than 'get in'.

    'Get in' has more meanings, such as 'Get in the queue', 'Don't get in my way' and 'I'll get in touch with you soon.'

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: enter

    I would not have used "in" in any of those and I would have used "fit" instead of "get" for the second two. Could well be an American difference.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: enter

    I certainly wouldn't use "get" for #4. You might worry about "getting in" to an exclusive nightclub, but not to a party at a friend's house.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: enter

    In my opinion, "fit [in]" is not connected to "enter". It means "to position there if there is enough space".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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