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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    Traffic accident caused to him to lose his sight.

    Is "traffic accident" actually used in North America in place of "car accident"? I heard it's used in UK a little bit.

    37)A traffic accident caused to him to lose his sight.
    Last edited by keannu; 04-Sep-2013 at 23:31.

  2. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Traffic accident caused to him to lose his sight.

    If it was a car accident, you would be more likely to hear "car crash" used in AmE, I believe.
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: Traffic accident caused to him to lose his sight.

    Whichever alternative you choose, it has to begin with 'A'.

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    #4

    Re: Traffic accident caused to him to lose his sight.

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    If it was a car accident, you would be more likely to hear "car crash" used in AmE, I believe.
    That's informal. They wouldn't say that on the TV news.

    "Automobile accident" would probably be the most common. "Traffic accident" is possible, but I would only use it if the accident took place in a high traffic area. Like one car hits another cause someone ran a red light.

    If you were driving along a country road and lost control, that would not be a "traffic accident."

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Traffic accident caused to him to lose his sight.

    When referring to an individual who has been involved in an incident in any motor vehicle, I would say "car/motorbike crash/accident".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. keannu's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Traffic accident caused to him to lose his sight.

    So does "traffic accident" refer to non-colliding car accidents? But I have seldom heard it used.

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    #7

    Re: Traffic accident caused to him to lose his sight.

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    So does "traffic accident" refer to non-colliding car accidents? But I have seldom heard it used.
    No. Like I said above, any incident can be a car accident. You would not say it was a "traffic accident" if there was no traffic!

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Traffic accident caused to him to lose his sight.

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    No. Like I said above, any incident can be a car accident. You would not say it was a "traffic accident" if there was no traffic!
    I believe that, in Britain, the official police term for such an incident is "A road traffic accident".

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Traffic accident caused to him to lose his sight.

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I believe that, in Britain, the official police term for such an incident is "A road traffic accident".
    You're right. The police and ambulance services refer to it on the radio as an "RTA".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Traffic accident caused to him to lose his sight.

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Is "traffic accident" actually used in North America in place of "car accident"? I heard it's used in UK a little bit.

    37)Traffic accident caused to him to lose his sight.
    "Traffic accident" is used commonly in AmE. But there are many other phrases, many of which have already been covered here.

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