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    #1

    have got to

    Hello,
    I have a question, is the sentence "have got to go" grammatically correct? we have not learned this at school, just that have got is used with possession. When do we use it? and where is it normally used in spoken english? usa, britain..? Thank you for your answer.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: have got to

    Quote Originally Posted by martinisko View Post
    Hello,
    I have a question. Is the sentence phrase "have got to go" grammatically correct? We have not learned this at school, just that have got is used with possession. When do we use it? and where is it normally used in spoken English? USA? Britain? Thank you for your answer.
    "Have got to" is a common phrase used to indicate obligation. It can be used in place of "must" or "have to" for obligation. It is common in AmE and I believe also in BrE. The insertion of "got" into "have to" increases the emphasis on the obligation. Often "I have" is contracted to "I've".

    Sorry to leave you with the mess, but I've got to go now.
    I have got to pick up my children at 3.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: have got to

    Quote Originally Posted by martinisko View Post
    Hello,
    I have a question. Is the sentence "have got to go" grammatically correct? We have not learned this at school, just that "have got" is used with possession. When do we use it (no question mark required here) and where is it normally used in spoken English? USA? Britain? Thank you for your answer.
    Welcome to the forum.

    "Have got to go" is not a sentence. It is a fragment of a sentence. Please give us a complete sentence to work with.

    Also, please look at my amendments to your post (in red) and remember the rules of written English:

    - Start every sentence with a capital letter.
    - Always capitalise the word "I".
    - End every sentence with a single appropriate punctuation mark.
    - Capitalise proper nouns (English, United States of America or USA, Britain etc).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: have got to

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    "Have got to" is a common phrase used to indicate obligation. It can be used in place of "must" or "have to" for obligation. It is common in AmE and I believe also in BrE. The insertion of "got" into "have to" increases the emphasis on the obligation. Often "I have" is contracted to "I've".

    Sorry to leave you with the mess, but I've got to go now.
    I have got to pick up my children at 3.
    Martinisko: And you will also hear/read "I have to go now"/"I have to pick up my children" without "got" for obligation, and in that construct no contraction.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: have got to

    Quote Originally Posted by billmcd View Post
    Martinisko: And you will also hear/read "I have to go now"/"I have to pick up my children" without "got" for obligation, and in that construct no contraction.
    I agree with the first half of your post but my grandfather and his daughter (my aunt) said/say "I've to go to the Post Office later". I believe that in Irish English it's even more prevalent.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: have got to

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I agree with the first half of your post but my grandfather and his daughter (my aunt) said/say "I've to go to the Post Office later". I believe that in Irish English it's even more prevalent.
    It is indeed, Ems.

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    #7

    Re: have got to

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I agree with the first half of your post but my grandfather and his daughter (my aunt) said/say "I've to go to the Post Office later". I believe that in Irish English it's even more prevalent.
    Spoken and written?

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: have got to

    Quote Originally Posted by billmcd View Post
    Spoken and written?
    I don't know about ems' grandparents but in Irish English, yes.

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