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  1. euncu's Avatar
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    #1

    far the better of...

    Hello;

    The following line is from the BBC News;

    Countries supporting intervention had "far the better of the argument" in discussions, Mr Cameron added.

    I failed to get what "far the better of" means thus the whole sentence.

    I googled it and got four million hits but couldn't find its meaning. I've known "far better" but the above phrase has a different construction.

    Thanks for your answers in advance.

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    #2

    Re: far the better of...

    You sure it wasn't "by far"?

  2. euncu's Avatar
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    #3

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    #4

    Re: far the better of...

    I'm going to assume they missed the "by" or that BrE uses the phrase differently.

    To have the better of an argument is to have a more convincing case. To have this "by far" means the other side was not close to having the better argument.

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