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    #1

    slip and steal

    - she slipped away/stole away while her parents were watching the TV.
    - he slipped out/stole out of the house when I was having a shower upstairs.

    Do these two phrasal verbs mean the same in this kind of context and are they both commonly used in everyday's language?
    Can they be replaced with "to sneak away" and "to sneak out"?

    Thank you very much.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: slip and steal

    "To steal away" is quite literal. I can't imagine using it in my everyday speech. "Slipped away/out" are more colloquial.

    You could say "He sneaked away from the house" or "He sneaked out of the house" but they don't mean the same thing.

    The first suggests he was already outside and was sneaking through the garden or perhaps down the street. The latter suggests he exited the house in a sneaky way, perhaps through a window or tiptoeing through the door without anyone noticing.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 10-Sep-2013 at 18:00. Reason: Appalling typo!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: slip and steal

    In my dated variety of BrE, 'stole away' is fine, and practically synonymous with 'slipped away'.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: slip and steal

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    In my dated variety of BrE, 'stole away' is fine, and practically synonymous with 'slipped away'.
    I like it but I can only imagine reading it, not saying it. I can just hear Agatha Christie using it.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: slip and steal

    Our North American friends have an alternative informal word for 'sneaked': snuck.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: slip and steal

    I almost typed that but I realised that, for a reason I can't quite fathom, I would say "snuck out" but "sneaked around".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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