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    #1

    How to express the feeling of a hug

    Hi, body, good evening,
    I'd like to know how can I express the feeling of a hug to a group or a person in a conversation/ post.
    Maybe, great hug?
    Or, great hugs?
    Neither?
    Thanks for your support.
    Bye.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: How to express the feeling of a hug

    Quote Originally Posted by cinemantos View Post
    Hi, body, good evening, Unnecessary and I think you meant "everybody", not "body"!

    I'd like to know how can I express the feeling of a hug to a group or a person in a conversation/post.

    Maybe, great hug?
    Or, great hugs?
    Neither?
    Thanks for your support.
    Bye Unnecessary.
    Do you mean a spoken conversation or in an email or online post? Why are you trying to convey this? Did you have a hug with the person earlier and you want to tell them that you enjoyed it? Or are you trying to use it to mean "I'm sending you a [virtual] hug"?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: How to express the feeling of a hug

    not a teacher

    Maybe, great hug?

    In my experience a more common collocation is "a big hug".
    For example in phone calls:
    "Tell the kids that I'll be home tomorrow and give them all a big hug from me".
    "I'm very proud of what you've achieved, so a big hug and I'll speak to you later".

  2. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: How to express the feeling of a hug

    I recall having read "humongous hug" even (in a James Patterson novel; Alex Cross - the main character - describes a hug by his daughter as "humongous").
    Last edited by charliedeut; 13-Sep-2013 at 11:13. Reason: added data
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: How to express the feeling of a hug

    There are myriad adjectives that could precede "hug".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: How to express the feeling of a hug

    I know. It's just that I had never heard that adjective before; that's why I remember the collocation.

    PS: Funny, though, about "myriad". I would have used it in the singular: "a myriad of adjectives". Could be a literal translation from Spanish, though.
    Last edited by charliedeut; 13-Sep-2013 at 12:03. Reason: added PS
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: How to express the feeling of a hug

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    I know. It's just that I had never heard that adjective before; that's why I remember the collocation.

    PS: Funny, though, about "myriad". I would have used it in the singular: "a myriad of adjectives". Could be a literal translation from Spanish, though.
    Seeing "a myriad of" always jumps off the page at me. My grandfather (a stickler for these things) taught me when I was very, very young that it is incorrect. The definition of "myriad" is "a great many". Consequently, it would not be grammatical to follow it with "of".

    There are myriad adjectives which would work.
    There are a great many adjectives which would work.

    There is a myriad of adjectives which would work.
    There is a great many of adjectives which would work.

    However, I am well aware that many dictionaries give "a myriad of possibilities" or similar as an example sentence. All I can say is that I find it much more natural and pleasant to use it on its own before a plural noun, without an "of".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: How to express the feeling of a hug

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Seeing "a myriad of" always jumps off the page at me. My grandfather (a stickler for these things) taught me when I was very, very young that it is incorrect. The definition of "myriad" is "a great many". Consequently, it would not be grammatical to follow it with "of".

    There are myriad adjectives which would work.
    There are a great many adjectives which would work.

    There is a myriad of adjectives which would work.
    There is a great many of adjectives which would work.

    However, I am well aware that many dictionaries give "a myriad of possibilities" or similar as an example sentence. All I can say is that I find it much more natural and pleasant to use it on its own before a plural noun, without an "of".
    I use it both ways (noun and adjective). Interestingly, according to this usage note, the noun use preceded the adjective use and was preferred for a long time: myriad - definition of myriad by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: How to express the feeling of a hug

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I use it both ways (noun and adjective). Interestingly, according to this usage note, the noun use preceded the adjective use and was preferred for a long time: myriad - definition of myriad by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.
    Yes, I read that yesterday too. Hence, I wasn't surprised at the example sentences in the dictionaries.

    We appear to have become distracted again. So, cinemantos, have we helped you?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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