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    #1

    go past

    hi,


    I'd like to know is the following usage for ''go past'' is correct, please.

    when I look at the graph after measuring the ... , I see many spikes and valleys. as I slide the finger on the "x" axis on the graph, I get different values depending on the spike or valley the finger is going past.

    the context is the following: it is a software for smartphone that exhibits a two axis diagram (or graphic). on the diagram I can see a parabola with many spikes and valleys. as I run the finger on the parabola, a value is shown on the screen. I think I should have used ''run'' instead of ''go past'', but I'd like to know if "go past" sounds too non-native English, please.


    thanks.

  1. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: go past

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    hi,


    I'd like to know is the following usage for ''go past'' is correct, please.

    When I look at the graph after measuring the ... , I see many spikes and valleys. As I slide a finger on the "x" axis on the graph, I get different values of ...., depending on the spike or valley the finger is going past.

    the context is the following: it is a software for smartphone that exhibits a two axis diagram (or graphic). on the diagram I can see a parabola with many spikes and valleys. as I run the finger on the parabola, a value is shown on the screen. I think I should have used ''run'' instead of ''go past'', but I'd like to know if "go past" sounds too non-native English, please.


    thanks.


    "Going past" works perfectly well for me. You might consider adding what is is you are getting different values of [ie whatever is being measured on the "y" axis]
    Note my other corrections. Always start a sentence with a capital letter.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

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