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  1. Banned
    Interested in Language
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    #1

    Thumbs up Like

    Alex: "Well, you know how you are when you're on vacation. You're so carefree; you never expect anything serious to happen to you. I still keep thinking about all the stories of those tourists who were on vacation in Asia when that monster tsunami hit. Well, actually, the first story on that show was about that. There was this girl from England. Umm... Tilly Smith...."

    Jennifer: "What happened to her?

    Alex: "Well, here's this ten-year-old girl who, like, saved her parents and dozens of other people who were all on the beach in Phuket....in Thailand, because she'd learned about tsunami in school.

    Hi,

    The blue word "Like" makes me confused. In that part of the sentence, the word "like" is a verb to mean "love" or is a preposition to indicate a similarity?

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Like

    It's just a filler or linguistic tic, like.

    b

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Like

    Seriously, you should, like, pay no attention to it.

    I'm afraid that I, like, use it too.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #4

    Re: Like

    Well, then it is just a filer and has no meaning, right?

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Like

    Quote Originally Posted by kite View Post
    Well, then it is just a filler and has no meaning, right?
    Yes.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Like

    That is, "Yes, it has no meaning." Ignore it when you look for the meaning of a sentence when it has a comma on either side.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Like

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    That is, "Yes, it has no meaning." Ignore it when you look for the meaning of a sentence when it has a comma on either side.
    One cannot like trust people who like use "like" a lot to be like consistent with comma use.

  7. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Like

    Good point. And as it occurs mostly in speech, you have to hear the commas. But I agree with Barb - so long as you have the luxury of seeing the punctuation - I'd never thought of it. Good point too

    b

  8. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Like

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    One cannot like trust people who like use "like" a lot to be like consistent with comma use.
    But even hardened "like" users in speech don't write that way. You'll see the "verbal tic" only in writing by someone who is capturing what was actually said or mimicking dialogue, so it should be there.

    I wanted to contrast that use not only with the standard meanings but also with the current uses: "And I'm like 'We're through, Jim. Don't think you can even talk to me after you slept with Donna' and he's all like I didn't know you knew' and even 'I'm going to pretend I don't know what she means' and he's all like 'What?' And I'm like 'Don't even try!'

    "Like" takes on the versatile role of substituting for "said" and "feel" and "behaved" and you will find that in writing in things like Facebook posts.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 18-Sep-2013 at 11:52.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  9. BobK's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Like

    That use of like has a posh name, which I can't recall at the moment... 'phatic'? At a summer school, in an extra-curricular context, one student was telling a story and said 'And I'm like, "Duh?"'. But she knew what she was doing and wouldn't have used it in a more formal context.

    b

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