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    #1

    Question notice+O+Ving

    Do you regard 'notice' as a sense verb?

    In Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English:
    hear
    hear sb/sth doing sth
    hear sb do sth

    see
    see sb/sth doing sth
    see sb/sth do sth

    But for 'notice'
    notice sb/sth doing sth
    (There is nothing like 'notice sb do sth' listed.)

    In Oxford Dictionary of English 2nd edition:
    He noticed the youths behaving suspiciously.

    In Merriam-Webster's Dictionary for iOS 3.29:
    He noticed his friend sitting at the next table.
    She noticed me leaving the meeting early.

    However, in the textbook we are using, 'notice' is listed as a sense verb. Thus, the use of 'V' and 'V-ing' are both correct.

    Can I infer that the use of 'V' after 'notice' is an obsolete style because the latest dictionaries discard that usage?

    Thank you in advance.

  1. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: notice+O+Ving

    Notice is indeed a sense verb. All the dictionary examples are correct.

    What do you mean by "the use of 'V' and 'V-ing' ?

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    #3

    Re: notice+O+Ving

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    Notice is indeed a sense verb. All the dictionary examples are correct.

    What do you mean by "the use of 'V' and 'V-ing' ?
    Sorry for the vague expression.
    'V' stands for 'verb root' and 'V-ing' stands for ‘present participle
    (I intended to put 'do' and 'doing'.)

    The style of 'notice+sb+doing(present participle) sth' is surely correct.
    'He noticed his friend sitting at the next table.'
    However, I doubt the style of 'notice+sb+do(verb root)+sth' is obsolete, though the textbook that we are using still lists this usage.
    I cannot find any style like 'notice+sb+do+sth' in the latest dictionaries.
    But for other sense verbs, all the dictionaries list both usage: verb root and present participle.
    For the word 'notice', the latest dictionaries only include one usage: present participle.
    Does that mean the usage of 'notice' is changing?

    Conclusion:
    He noticed his friend sitting at the next table. ()
    He noticed his friend sit at the next table. ()

    In your everyday English, do you find it true?
    Last edited by simile; 26-Sep-2013 at 01:44.

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    #4

    Re: notice+O+Ving

    I think all of the usages are still current and natural.

    "I noticed her checking him out."
    "He noticed his friend sit at the next table" is also correct, if a trifle forced.
    "He noticed his friend glance at the newcomer with interest."

    I've deliberately chosen examples that might be used by youngsters in order to show how current these usages still are.

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