Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. englishhobby's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 1,678
    #1

    In time (again)

    I have read all the posts on this forum related to the discussion of the difference between in time and on time and now I've got it. In time means "before it's not too late, before the last moment". But there is one question unanswered: I wonder if we can use in time in the following situation:

    I decide (all of a sudden) to visit my parents because I've happened to get close to their house (on some business). So I drop by their house and there are some friends there having tea and cake. Can my Mum say: Oh, you are always in time. We've just started having tea and cake.


    In this situation it's not "just before the last moment", because they have only started, there's plenty of cake and plenty of time yet.

    So my question is: Can one come accidentally in time, without having the event in mind at all? (In my situation I came on a sudden impulse, not knowing about the cake). All the earlier explanations "explain" about events people are going to on purpose keeping these events in mind. And in my situation I had no idea Mum had made a cake, was I also in time? Is there a difference?
    Last edited by englishhobby; 01-Oct-2013 at 07:28.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: In time (again)

    Quote Originally Posted by englishhobby View Post
    I have read all the posts on this forum related to the discussion of the difference between in time and on time and now I've got it. In time means "before it's not too late, before the last moment". But there is one question unanswered I wonder if we can use in time in the following situation:

    I decide (all of a sudden) to visit my parents because I've happened to get close to their house (on some business). So I drop by their house and there are some friends there having tea and cake. Can my Mum say: Oh, you are always in time. We've just started having tea and cake.


    In this situation it's not "just before the last moment", because they have only started, there's plenty of cake and plenty of time yet.

    So my question is: Can one come accidentally in time, without having the event in mind at all? (In my situation I came on a sudden impulse, not knowing about the cake). All the earlier explanations "explain" about events people are going to on purpose keeping these events in mind. And in my situation I had no idea Mum had made a cake, was I also in time? Is there a difference?
    Yes, but one would say "You have arrived just in time for tea and cake".
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 30-Sep-2013 at 23:37. Reason: typo

Similar Threads

  1. [Cover Letter] long time reader, first time poster: please check my cover letter!
    By sssupersssnake in forum CVs, Resumes and Applications
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 29-Jul-2013, 21:09
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-Jul-2013, 15:27
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-Apr-2013, 20:59
  4. Apostrophe+s with weeks time, days time etc..
    By aachu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 28-Mar-2012, 18:49
  5. [General] plenty of time/ample time/as if with some purpose/deliberately/
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23-Aug-2009, 04:48

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •