Results 1 to 8 of 8
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Dominican Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Dominican Republic

    • Join Date: Sep 2013
    • Posts: 247
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Use of : No and Nothing versus Do Not and Not Any.

    Dear teachers and members:


    I have a grammar issue about the use of: NO and NOTHING versus DO NOT and NOT ANY. I know that double negative cannot be used in English, so here I expose the following:

    a:

    1) He doesn't have anything to say about it.

    2) He has nothing to say about it.

    3) He hasn't got anything to say about it (BrE)


    I know the first sentence is the most formal, but I do not consider the second one to be informal and incorrect. In my opinion the third sentence is more of bristish usage.

    b:

    1)
    I don't have any doubt about your explanation, but I don't agree in all of your points.

    2) I have no doubt about your explanation, but I don't agree in all of your points.


    As above, I recognize (BrE = recognise) that the first sentence is the most formal, but I consider the second one not to be informal and incorrect.


    Hoping for your assistance and help in this matter.


    Sincerely,


    The Apprentice.

    Last edited by The apprentice; 02-Oct-2013 at 07:09. Reason: editing and add something

  1. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,135
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Use of : No and Nothing versus Do Not and Not Any.

    Quote Originally Posted by The apprentice View Post
    1) He doesn't have anything to say about it.
    2) He has nothing to say about it.
    3) He hasn't got anything to say about it (BrE)

    I know the first sentence is the most formal, but I do not consider the second one to be informal and incorrect. In my opinion the third sentence is more of bristish British usage.
    All three are fine in BrE. #2 is probably the most formal.
    1) I don't have any doubt about your explanation, but I don't agree in all of your points.
    2) I have no doubt about your explanation, but I don't agree in all of your points.
    Both are fine, except that it's 'agree with'. We might well use the plural 'doubts'. #2 is more formal.

    Last edited by 5jj; 02-Oct-2013 at 11:29. Reason: typo

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 21,520
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: Use of : No and Nothing versus Do Not and Not Any.

    I know that double negatives cannot be used in English.
    That is not so — we often use double negatives.

    'The situation is bad; we can't just do nothing about it' (we have to do something about it).

    'I don't altogether disagree with you' (I agree with you but with some reservations).

    Rover

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Dominican Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Dominican Republic

    • Join Date: Sep 2013
    • Posts: 247
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: Use of : No and Nothing versus Do Not and Not Any.

    Dear Rover, teachers and members:

    I was referring not to use a double negatives in the following examples:

    1) I didn't see nothing you told me about

    2) She doesn't buy nothing at Macy's store

    3) He doesn't have no money at all.


    According to my grammar knowledge these sentences are not grammarly correct, it would be written as follows:

    1) I didn't see anything you told me about

    2) She doesn't buy anything at Macy's store

    3) He doesn't have any money at all.


    Thank you all for your answers.


    Thankfully,



    The Appretice
    Last edited by The apprentice; 29-Nov-2013 at 06:32. Reason: Change in type of letter

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 21,520
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: Use of : No and Nothing versus Do Not and Not Any.

    Add the missing full stops and your amendments are correct.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Dominican Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Dominican Republic

    • Join Date: Sep 2013
    • Posts: 247
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: Use of : No and Nothing versus Do Not and Not Any.

    Rover_KE:

    I don't understand what you mean in your last statement (Add the missing full stops and your amendments are correct) or you mean that my sentences are incomplete, please, can you give an explanation about it?


    Sincerely,


    The Apprentice.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 34,344
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: Use of : No and Nothing versus Do Not and Not Any.

    If you add a full stop at the end of each of your versions of the sentences, they will be correct. The amendments you have made to the words are correct but you haven't put a full stop at the end of sentences 1 and 2 so they are not correct full sentences.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Dominican Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Dominican Republic

    • Join Date: Sep 2013
    • Posts: 247
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: Use of : No and Nothing versus Do Not and Not Any.

    Thank you Rover_KE and emsr2d2:


    Now I understand what you mean when you say to add a full stop to the sentence.



    The Apprentice

Similar Threads

  1. Indeed versus actually
    By sebayanpendam in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24-Jul-2012, 17:08
  2. besides versus beside
    By sio in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Dec-2009, 02:57
  3. [Grammar] have versus has
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-Aug-2008, 18:41
  4. might versus may
    By angelg in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 23-Jun-2008, 00:30
  5. Think Versus Think of/about
    By peterwook in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-May-2008, 12:22

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •