Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. meliss's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 248
    #1

    lettuce on his chest

    "Two men in FSB (Federal Security Service) uniforms barged in.... the taller of the two officials, the one with more lettuce on his chest.."
    The only my suggestion for "lettuce" here is "hair", but how could one see the chest of someone in the uniform?
    Thank you.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,615
    #2

    Re: lettuce on his chest

    Quote Originally Posted by meliss View Post
    "Two men in FSB (Federal Security Service) uniforms barged in.... the taller of the two officials, the one with more lettuce on his chest.."
    The only my suggestion for "lettuce" here is "hair", but how could one see the chest of someone in the uniform?
    Thank you.
    Where are you getting all this material from, melliss?

  3. meliss's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 248
    #3

    Re: lettuce on his chest

    I answered this question many times actually :). And once again - here.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2010
    • Posts: 1,696
    #4

    Re: lettuce on his chest

    Quote Originally Posted by meliss View Post
    "Two men in FSB (Federal Security Service) uniforms barged in.... the taller of the two officials, the one with more lettuce on his chest.."
    The only my suggestion for "lettuce" here is "hair", but how could one see the chest of someone in the uniform?
    Thank you.
    The men were in uniform. People in uniform sometimes have medals (a symbol of a deed or some time of service) pinned on the right chest of their uniform. In the US we would call this brass. Think of a character from a comic opera with many medals on his uniform.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,615
    #5

    Re: lettuce on his chest

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    The men were in uniform. People in uniform sometimes have medals (a symbol of a deed or some time of service) pinned on the right chest of their uniform. In the US we would call this brass. Think of a character from a comic opera with many medals on his uniform.
    I've never heard that called "lettuce".

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,479
    #6

    Re: lettuce on his chest

    Quote Originally Posted by meliss View Post
    I answered this question many times actually :). And once again - here.
    Meliss, we are not going to buy a book from Amazon to discover the context of the quotations you are asking about.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,838
    #7

    Re: lettuce on his chest

    When we ask for context and source, we don't just want the title and author of a book. What we want is an answer something like "I am currently reading a book about two policemen who meet when they are trying to solve a murder case. They have just left a bar when one of them says "Oh shoot. I've left my keys. I'll be back in a minute". What I want to know is why the man says "Oh shoot" - is he suggesting that the other policeman should kill someone with his gun?"

    If you posted "A man says "Oh shoot". What does that mean?" and we said "Where are you getting this from?", it would be no help if you answered "From Cujo by Stephen King".

    Do you now understand why we need context?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #8

    Re: lettuce on his chest

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I've never heard that called "lettuce".
    I have heard of lettuce referring to the braid and oak leaf clusters on uniforms. An assortment of brightly colored ribbons on the chest is sometimes called fruit salad.

  7. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #9

    Re: lettuce on his chest

    I agree- I've heard fruit salad to refer to the medals, but never lettuce.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  8. probus's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 3,458
    #10

    Re: lettuce on his chest

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    The men were in uniform. People in uniform sometimes have medals (a symbol of a deed or some time of service) pinned on the right chest of their uniform. In the US we would call this brass. Think of a character from a comic opera with many medals on his uniform.
    If the decorations are your own, awarded to you, you wear them on the left side of your chest. If you are wearing someone else's medals, for example an ancestor's, then you wear them on the right side.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. head of lettuce
    By keannu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 15-Jan-2012, 15:47
  2. iceberg lettuce
    By changeling in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-May-2008, 00:48
  3. That puts me out of my chest
    By Stromgol in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 17-Apr-2008, 00:00
  4. -chest, -shire
    By peter123 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 27-Oct-2007, 18:10
  5. chest thumping
    By Romel Panzer in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Oct-2007, 13:47

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •