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  1. dodonaomik's Avatar
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    #1

    the review of the definition: girl

    The problem suddenly appeared in my brain, and I wanna know the answer very much.


    In China, if I fall in love with a female(a Chinese) who is 34 years old and unmarried, I will call her "girl" when I text messages her in English.
    【In fact, generally, most Chinese will think a female should be called "girl" when she's a virgin and conversely a woman.



    MY QUESTION:
    If I stay in America and have a female colleague(who is 34 years old American and unmarried ) at work, is it right/polite/proper if I say "Girl, would you have a cup with me"?



    Thanks in advance!
    Last edited by dodonaomik; 05-Oct-2013 at 14:15.

  2. dodonaomik's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: the review of the definition: girl

    Although in my memory I know I should say "Hello, would you have a cup with me?" or "Anna(if her name is Anna), would you have a cup with me?" , I really wanna know whether it is right if I say "Girl, would you have a cup with me?".

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: the review of the definition: girl

    If you said that to me at any age, I would think you very rude. If someone asks me out on a date, I expect them to address me by name. At the age of 34, most females wouldn't consider themselves "girls". Bear in mind, though, that even into their fifties and sixties, you might hear some women referring to a forthcoming evening out with female friends as "I'm going out with the girls on Saturday night".

    Also note that you don't ask someone to have a "cup" with you - you ask them out for a drink, a coffee, a cup of coffee/tea, a meal etc.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. dodonaomik's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: the review of the definition: girl

    emsr2d2 :
    Thanks for your great help.
    Oh, my gosh! The Chinglish is wrong totally.
    I will review the definition about girl and bear in mind that I should use "have a cup of coffee/tea".


    In fact, some very simple English words are misused widespreadly in China.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: the review of the definition: girl

    Quote Originally Posted by dodonaomik View Post
    emsr2d2 :
    Thanks for your great help.
    Oh, my gosh! The Chinglish Chinglish is totally wrong. totally
    I will review the definition/usage about of girl and bear in mind that I should use "have a cup of coffee/tea".


    In fact, some very simple English words are widely misused widespreadly in China.
    Some very simple English words are misused everywhere!

    Note my amendments to your post above. We say "totally wrong", not "wrong totally" and "widely misused", not "misused widespreadly". In fact "widespreadly" is not a word. You can say "The misuse of this word is widespread". I think you meant to underline the word "Chinglish" rather than crossing it out.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: the review of the definition: girl

    First, I must completely agree with Ems that if someone said "Girl, you want to have a cup of coffee?" I'd be really annoyed.

    However, I think it's important to point out that you WILL hear "Girl" as a form of address among peers in certain exchanges - usually, giving a compliment.
    Girl, you are ROCKING that dress. (Anna, you look very nice in that dress.)
    Girl, you are breaking hearts tonight! (Anna, that's the third guy you turned down when he asked if he could buy you a drink.)

    You kind of emphasize the first part of the word: GUUURl, you are.. It has a rather "urban" feel to it.

    Do NOT use this with your grandmother, the person serving you communion in church, etc.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: the review of the definition: girl

    Quote Originally Posted by dodonaomik View Post
    The problem suddenly appeared in my brain, and I wanna know the answer very much.


    In China, if I fall in love with a female(a Chinese) who is 34 years old and unmarried, I will call her "girl" when I text messages her in English.
    【In fact, generally, most Chinese will think a female should be called "girl" when she's a virgin and conversely a woman.



    MY QUESTION:
    If I stay in America and have a female colleague(who is 34 years old American and unmarried ) at work, is it right/polite/proper if I say "Girl, would you have a cup with me"?



    Thanks in advance!
    I hate to ask you this, but how would a Chinese man know, in advance of intimacy, that a 34-year-old unmarried woman is virgin?

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: the review of the definition: girl

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I hate to ask you this, but how would a Chinese man know, in advance of intimacy, that a 34-year-old unmarried woman is virgin?
    I wondered the exact same thing! I'm also intrigued by the idea of falling in love with someone before you've even invited them out for a coffee. Maybe love at first sight is rife in China.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  9. dodonaomik's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: the review of the definition: girl

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Some very simple English words are misused everywhere!

    Note my amendments to your post above. We say "totally wrong", not "wrong totally" and "widely misused", not "misused widespreadly". In fact "widespreadly" is not a word. You can say "The misuse of this word is widespread". I think you meant to underline the word "Chinglish" rather than crossing it out.
    memsr2d2:
    Thank you so much!
    Hehe, maybe in my understanding, Chinglish conceals the false using of English, so I wanna cross it out.

  10. dodonaomik's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: the review of the definition: girl

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    First, I must completely agree with Ems that if someone said "Girl, you want to have a cup of coffee?" I'd be really annoyed.

    However, I think it's important to point out that you WILL hear "Girl" as a form of address among peers in certain exchanges - usually, giving a compliment.
    Girl, you are ROCKING that dress. (Anna, you look very nice in that dress.)
    Girl, you are breaking hearts tonight! (Anna, that's the third guy you turned down when he asked if he could buy you a drink.)

    You kind of emphasize the first part of the word: GUUURl, you are.. It has a rather "urban" feel to it.

    Do NOT use this with your grandmother, the person serving you communion in church, etc.
    Barb_D:
    Thank you very very very much!
    And you urge me to understand that the basic word "girl" contains a kind of particular culture full of warmth.

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