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    #1

    Grammatically right?

    The whole sentence is as follows:

    Brush your teeth first, because the two things I can think of that are worse than a bad style are bad breath and bad manners!

    I think there're improperly two ares without proper and and that or which.

    Can anyone lend me a helping hand? Thanks so much.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Grammatically right?

    Quote Originally Posted by coolfool View Post
    The whole sentence is as follows:

    Brush your teeth first, because the two things I can think of that are worse than a bad style are bad breath and bad manners!

    I think there're improperly two ares without proper and and that or which.

    Can anyone lend me a helping hand? Thanks so much.
    The sentence is mostly fine (apart from "a bad style" which should not have an article and an unnecessary comma). "That" and "which" are optional. I have put them in brackets below.

    - Brush your teeth first because the two things [that] I can think of [which] are worse than bad style are bad breath and bad manners.

    The word "are" is required twice. It might help you to look at the sentence using a different word order to see why both are used.
    Bad breath and bad manners are the two things [that] I can think of [which] are worse than bad style.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: Grammatically right?

    1. My understanding is a sentence like A is B is C, unlike A is A is A, isn't acceptable. If you say yah, there's no argument whatsoever. If you do nah, let's see the following.

    2. The whole sentence is
    Brush your teeth first, because the two things I can think of that are worse than a bad style are bad breath and bad manners!
    The part in question is
    the two things I can think of that are worse than a bad style are bad breath and bad manners!

    3. Let's let
    A = the two things
    B = I can think of
    C = worse than a bad style
    D = bad breath and bad manners!

    4. To put it simply at first, let's get rid of B temporarily.

    5. If the pattern is A that is C is D or A, which is C, is D, it becomes
    the two things that are worse than a bad style are bad breath and bad manners!
    or
    the two things, which are worse than a bad style, are bad breath and bad manners!

    6. If the pattern is A is C that/which is D or A is C, which is D, it becomes
    the two things are worse than a bad style that/which are bad breath and bad manners!
    or
    the two things are worse than a bad style, which are bad breath and bad manners!

    7. If the pattern is A is C and D, it becomes
    the two things are worse than a bad style and (are) bad breath and bad manners!

    8. Now, let's add B to the above sentence and see what we can get.

    9. If the pattern is A that B and is C is D or A, which B and is C, is D, it becomes
    the two things that I can think of and are worse than a bad style are bad breath and bad manners!
    or
    the two things, which I can think of and are worse than a bad style, are bad breath and bad manners!

    10. If the pattern is A B is C that/which is D or A B is C, which is D, it becomes
    the two things (that) I can think of are worse than a bad style that/which are bad breath and bad manners!
    or
    the two things (that) I can think of are worse than a bad style, which are bad breath and bad manners!

    11. If the pattern is A B is C and D, it becomes
    the two things (that) I can think of are worse than a bad style and (are) bad breath and bad manners!

    12. To be advised, if any.
    Last edited by coolfool; 06-Oct-2013 at 14:47.

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    #4

    Re: Grammatically right?

    11. If the pattern is A B is C and D, it becomes
    the two things (that) I can think of are worse than a bad style and (are) bad breath and bad manners!
    This is wrong- and is incorrect, because the two things = breath + manners not bad style + breath and manners. The relative pronoun can be omitted here, so the original is fine, though you can say the two things that too.

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    #5

    Re: Grammatically right?

    I'm wondering if well-bred, well-read native English speakers would ever write something like
    A I can think of you can't think of he can think of she can't think of that is B and C and D is E and F and G.
    if I'm allowed here to exaggerate the original sentence?

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    #6

    Re: Grammatically right?

    Quote Originally Posted by coolfool View Post
    I'm wondering if well-bred, well-read native English speakers would ever write something like
    A I can think of you can't think of he can think of she can't think of that is B and C and D is E and F and G.
    No. It's incomprehensible.

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    #7

    Re: Grammatically right?

    Quote Originally Posted by coolfool View Post
    I'm wondering if well-bred, well-read native English speakers would ever write something like
    A I can think of you can't think of he can think of she can't think of that is B and C and D is E and F and G.
    if I'm allowed here to exaggerate the original sentence?
    That's not exaggeration. It's gibberish.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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