Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. englishhobby's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 1,681
    #1

    Fine tea

    Is fine tea just very good quality tea or is it assosiated with very small tea leaves which is not too good?
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,629
    #2

    Re: Fine tea

    Quote Originally Posted by englishhobby View Post
    Is fine tea just very good quality tea or is it assosiated with very small tea leaves which is not too good?
    Generally "fine tea" means good quality tea.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Aug 2013
    • Posts: 41
    #3

    Re: Fine tea

    Could be either. We need a context. Where did you see/hear it?

  3. englishhobby's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 1,681
    #4

    Re: Fine tea

    Quote Originally Posted by Pangus View Post
    Could be either. We need a context. Where did you see/hear it?
    I need to teach my students vocabulary and I want to show them the difference between the words fine and nice. Forming new word combinations helps understand some subtlties in the meaning of words better. I think, "nice tea" would mean perhaps that the tea box is beautiful or the tea in a cup is of very good colour and pleasant to look at, while fine tea is good quality tea.

    I sometimes try to think the way native speakers do, but I often fail to. What about this time?
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Aug 2013
    • Posts: 41
    #5

    Re: Fine tea

    I'll agree with Bhaisahab then.

    I would say that 'nice' would be used in general conversation to say that the tea was pleasant or tasted good. 'Fine' would more likely be used for marketing to make the tea sound like a luxury good.

    e.g. 'Let's get home and have a nice cup of tea'
    e.g. 'The Fine Tea Company'

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #6

    Re: Fine tea

    Quote Originally Posted by englishhobby View Post
    I need to teach my students vocabulary and I want to show them the difference between the words fine and nice. Forming new word combinations helps understand some subtlties in the meaning of words better. I think, "nice tea" would mean perhaps that the tea box is beautiful or the tea in a cup is of very good colour and pleasant to look at, while fine tea is good quality tea.

    I sometimes try to think the way native speakers do, but I often fail to. What about this time?
    I am far from an expert on tea, but it seems that "fine", when used with tea, can mean a superior tea or a fine cut tea. If that is the case, tea might be the wrong example for your lesson. You might want to consider an alternative such as jewelry or some other category.

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,629
    #7

    Re: Fine tea

    "Fine tea(s)" is commonly used to mean good quality tea. Here is one of many examples: Harney & Sons Fine Teas –Produce Quality Loose Leaf Teas

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,912
    #8

    Re: Fine tea

    It's also used with other foods- fine wines, etc.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,912
    #9

    Re: Fine tea

    Quote Originally Posted by englishhobby View Post
    Is fine tea just very good quality tea or is it assosiated with very small tea leaves which is not too good?
    Fannings and dusts are the terms for the smaller bits of tea, though these are not used in everyday conversation.

  6. englishhobby's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 1,681
    #10

    Re: Fine tea

    Quote Originally Posted by Pangus View Post
    I'll agree with Bhaisahab then.

    I would say that 'nice' would be used in general conversation to say that the tea was pleasant or tasted good. 'Fine' would more likely be used for marketing to make the tea sound like a luxury good.

    e.g. 'Let's get home and have a nice cup of tea'
    e.g. 'The Fine Tea Company'
    That's the difference between fine and nice I need when talking about tea, thank you.)
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. WOuld you like a tea?
    By optimistic pessimist in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 28-May-2011, 03:43
  2. [General] eating a ravenous tea = devouring tea with ravenous appetite
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-May-2010, 10:10
  3. I was just making myself some tea
    By joham in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 16-Oct-2008, 23:52
  4. cup of tea
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-Dec-2006, 11:00

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •