Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1

    excuses

    Should I say:

    to procure excuses to a persistent client on behalf of the boss
    to fabricate excuses to a persistent client on behalf of the boss?

    Thank you,

    Ewelina


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 671
    #2

    Re: excuses

    Quote Originally Posted by ewelina
    Should I say:

    to procure excuses to a persistent client on behalf of the boss
    to fabricate excuses to a persistent client on behalf of the boss?

    Thank you,

    Ewelina
    You would not "procure" excuses in this context - "procure" literally means "buy", although the meaning may be stretched. For example, it is possible to say "I procured a delay in proceedings" meaning "I delayed the proceedings by verbally offering something in return."

    "To fabricate excuses" is a polite version of "to lie", so this would be the more appropriate phrase here.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Feb 2005
    • Posts: 2,585
    #3

    Re: excuses

    Additionally...

    You can "make excuses to a persistent client"; but "fabricate excuses to a persistent client" isn't idiomatic. ("Fabricate excuses" merely means "to invent excuses"; "to" on its own can't express the action of then presenting those excuses to the client.)

    So you would have to put it another way, e.g.

    1. He fabricated excuses to put off a persistent client on behalf of his boss.

    MrP

  2. #4

    Re: excuses

    Sad news is that the dictionaries I bought for a half of my salary are for nothing. They claim "procure" means inter alia to arrange (matters), produce (evidence), deliver or present or submit (documents).

    What do you think of "produce excuses"?

    My intention is to stress the fact that the excuses used before were not well-taken by clients, so it takes a lot of mind effort to invent new ones (believable this time).

    Many thanks.

    Ewelina

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Feb 2005
    • Posts: 2,585
    #5

    Re: excuses

    "Dream up excuses"?

    MrP

  3. #6

    Re: excuses

    MrP,

    Do you regard "dream up excuses" as formal language???

    ))

    Ewelina

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Feb 2005
    • Posts: 2,585
    #7

    Re: excuses

    Hello Ewelina

    I'm sorry, I didn't realize you were looking for a formal equivalent.

    (But what context is this for? Not a CV, I hope?)

    MrP

  4. #8

    Re: excuses

    No, not CV this time, but close in its importance, that's why I need a formal-sounding phrase.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Feb 2005
    • Posts: 2,585
    #9

    Re: excuses

    Hello Ewelina

    In that case, we may need something a little more diplomatic.

    Am I right in thinking that your role was to act as a barrier between persistent clients and your manager, and to make sure they didn't bother him?

    MrP

  5. #10

    Re: excuses

    you read my mind...

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •