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    #1

    adverb or preposition

    over - definition of over by Macmillan Dictionary

    Over
    can be used in the following ways:

    as a preposition (followed by a noun or a pronoun): a bridge over the river ♦ Two men were fighting over her. (followed by a number or amount): It happened over a hundred years ago.

    as an adverb (without a following noun): He fell over and broke his arm.
    after the verb 'to be': The semester will be over soon.

    above someone/something

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Does "over" function as a preposition in the following sentences ?

    1. Perry glanced at the clock over the door.

    2. The Simpsons live in a flat over the shop.
    3. We could see the Angolan flag flying over the governor's palace.
    4. She came and stood over him as he lay on the bed.

    Thanks.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: adverb or preposition

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    over - definition of over by Macmillan Dictionary

    Over
    can be used in the following ways:

    as a preposition (followed by a noun or a pronoun): a bridge over the river ♦ Two men were fighting over her. (followed by a number or amount): It happened over a hundred years ago.

    as an adverb (without a following noun): He fell over and broke his arm.
    after the verb 'to be': The semester will be over soon.

    above someone/something

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Does "over" function as a preposition in the following sentences ?

    1. Perry glanced at the clock over the door.

    2. The Simpsons live in a flat over the shop.
    3. We could see the Angolan flag flying over the governor's palace.
    4. She came and stood over him as he lay on the bed.

    Thanks.
    Tell us what you think.

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    #3

    Re: adverb or preposition

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Tell us what you think.
    Thanks Mike

    A preposition usually takes an object. I think they are all prepositions.

    However, I think the distinction between adverbs and prepositions is tricky because in some phrasal verbs they describes the verb, not the object.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: adverb or preposition

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Thanks Mike

    A preposition usually takes an object. I think they are all prepositions.

    However, I think the distinction between adverbs and prepositions is tricky because in some phrasal verbs they describes the verb, not the object.
    You are correct. All prepositions.

    Some phrasal verbs are followed by a bare preposition. When this occurs, some people call the "preposition" an adverb; others call it a particle.

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    #5

    Re: adverb or preposition

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    You are correct. All prepositions.

    Some phrasal verbs are followed by a bare preposition. When this occurs, some people call the "preposition" an adverb; others call it a particle.
    Thanks Mike

    "Some phrasal verbs are followed by a bare preposition". What is a bare preposition? Could you give me some examples, please?
    Last edited by Winwin2011; 22-Oct-2013 at 06:17.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: adverb or preposition

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Thanks Mike

    "Some phrasal verbs are followed by a bare preposition". Could you give me some examples, please?
    Check here https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/630/04/

    I chose intransitive phrasal verbs because with a transitive phrasal verb one can argue that the following word is a prepositional object. Many on this list are both prepositions and adverbs.

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    #7

    Re: adverb or preposition

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Check here https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/630/04/

    I chose intransitive phrasal verbs because with a transitive phrasal verb one can argue that the following word is a prepositional object. Many on this list are both prepositions and adverbs.
    Thanks Mike

    Is a 'bare preposition" without a following object just like intransitive phrasal verbs ?

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: adverb or preposition

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Thanks Mike

    Is a 'bare preposition" without a following object just like intransitive phrasal verbs ?
    Yes. Based on traditional terminology, it is difficult to call a word a preposition if it has no object. That is why some people call them adverbs (most can also be an adverb) or particles. With a transitive phrasal verb, the terminology gets more confusing. If a verb is a transitive phrasal verb, the following noun/pronoun is a technically a direct object of the phrasal verb. However, it could also be the object of the preposition in the phrasal verb. Take your pick.
    Last edited by MikeNewYork; 22-Oct-2013 at 07:13.

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