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    #1

    Does "way out" mean "exit" in British English?

    Does "way out" mean "exit" in British English? and "way in" means "entrance" in British English?
    Thanks a lot!

  1. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Does "way out" mean "exit" in British English?

    Quote Originally Posted by registered View Post
    Does "way out" mean "exit" in British English? And does "way in" mean "entrance" in British English?
    Thanks a lot!
    Yes.
    "Exit" and "Entrance" are commonly used here in the UK, but you will also see some signs saying "Way Out" and "Way In" here.
    Please note my corrections above. You must always start a new sentence after a question mark.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

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    #3

    Re: Does "way out" mean "exit" in British English?

    I can't thank you enough!
    But does it mean the same in America? Some one says it means "crazy" in America! For example: That guy is way out (crazy)!

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Does "way out" mean "exit" in British English?

    "Way out" means "weird" in both AmE and BrE. I'm not sure I'd say it was the same as crazy.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Does "way out" mean "exit" in British English?

    Quote Originally Posted by registered View Post
    I can't thank you enough!
    But does it mean the same in America? Some one says it means "crazy" in America! For example: That guy is way out (crazy)!
    Two different meanings:

    I will show you the way out. (exit)
    My sister is way out. (weird, unconventional)

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Does "way out" mean "exit" in British English?

    Equally common is "far out".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Does "way out" mean "exit" in British English?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Equally common is "far out".
    "Far out" can also mean "excellent" or "wonderful" or "very cool".

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Does "way out" mean "exit" in British English?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    "Far out" can also mean "excellent" or "wonderful" or "very cool".
    Interesting. I've only ever heard it used to mean "weird" or "unconventional".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Does "way out" mean "exit" in British English?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Interesting. I've only ever heard it used to mean "weird" or "unconventional".
    I think "far out" for a good thing started with the hippie movement in the 1960s. It meant something like "far out of this world".

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    #10

    Re: Does "way out" mean "exit" in British English?

    I think "way out there" means off the wall or odd or perhaps crazy. That idea is way out there.

    But I have never heard or said "something like My sister is way out" to mean "My sister is crazy." That's just not a use I am familiar with.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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