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    #1

    "to be also so" or "to be the same"? "Neither...nor"?

    Hello,


    please, correct this sentence: "I neither drink nor smoke, but you don't have to be also so/the same". By/with this sentence I want to say, that I am both non-drinker and non-smoker, but I would accept you even if you drink and smoke.


    Thanks
    Last edited by kasamb; 27-Oct-2013 at 21:00.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "to be also so" or "to be the same"? "Neither...nor"?

    Quote Originally Posted by kasamb View Post
    Hello.

    Please (no comma required here) correct this sentence: "I neither drink nor smoke, but you don't have to be also so/the same". By/with this sentence I want to say (no comma required here) that I am both a non-drinker and a non-smoker, but I would accept you even if you drink and smoke.

    Thanks.
    I neither drink nor smoke but I don't mind if you do either/both.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: "to be also so" or "to be the same"? "Neither...nor"?

    Thanks a lot! And what about "I am both a non-drinker and a non-smoker, but you don't have to be the same/also so/so too//I don't mind, if you are one of them or even both"

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "to be also so" or "to be the same"? "Neither...nor"?

    Quote Originally Posted by kasamb View Post
    Thanks a lot! And what about "I am both a non-drinker and a non-smoker, but you don't have to be the same/also so/so too//I don't mind, if you are one of them or even both"
    "You don't have to be the same" just about works.
    "I don't mind if you are one of them or even both" doesn't make sense. That means "I don't mind if you are a non-drinker and I don't mind if you are a non-smoker and I even don't mind if you are a non-drinker and a non-smoker!" It would be very odd if you did mind someone being a non-drinker/non-smoker given that you are both!

    It would be much more natural to say "I don't drink or smoke but I don't mind if you do".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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